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I have a binary image (size: 100x100) of a hand, that we can represent as a matrix composed only by 0 or 1 values. This is an example:

Example of a binary image of a human hand

Assuming that I have an array of double representing the linearized image, and that we call it image, I need to perform the following operations:

double accumulator = 0;
for (int j = 0; j < image.Length; ++j)
{
    accumulator += image[j] * weights[j];
}

In other words, I need to calculate the weighted sum of each pixel of the image array. weights represents an array that contains double values, and it is used to weight each pixel of the image.

Is the following code more efficient than the previous one?

double accumulator = 0;
for (int j = 0; j < image.Length; ++j)
{
    if (image[j] != 0)
    {
        accumulator += image[j] * weights[j];
    }
}
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closed as off topic by VitoShadow, Frank van Puffelen, Rachel Gallen, p.s.w.g, Grant Winney Mar 27 '13 at 1:04

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7  
Run both and see for yourself. –  Jason Watkins Mar 26 '13 at 18:51
    
If it was all non-0s it would clearly be slower. If it was all 0s it would likely be a lot faster. Where the lines cross is anyone's guess. :) I recommend Stopwatch and lots of trials with different bitmaps! If you even need to bother... –  Matthew Watson Mar 26 '13 at 18:52
1  
For the size of 100x100, if there is any difference at all, the difference will not be very significant. Unless you are dealing with many of such images, or the images may be bigger (millions of pixels), then there might be appreciable difference. –  nhahtdh Mar 26 '13 at 18:54
1  
Setting aside the premature optimization issue (so that there is something to discuss), branching can introduce various potential delays at the processor level, depending on whether the branches are readily predictable. The effect is processor-dependent and the magnitude of the effect is not likely to be very noticeable here. –  Dan Bryant Mar 26 '13 at 19:00
    
I ask the above question only to comprehend if the 'if' instruction is slow as a multiplication... The correct answer is 'it is impossible to say'. It's right? –  VitoShadow Mar 26 '13 at 19:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The answer is - you really don't need to be worrying about this at this juncture. If your code is running too slow, then you can experiment with some optimization. However, "too slow" is subjective.

Premature Optimization Is The Root Of All Evil.

As angelatlarge points out, for the moment - go with what is easily readable, and easily maintainable.

share|improve this answer
    
@MatthewWatson, absolutely. I optimized my typing prematurely. Shame on me. :) –  Moo-Juice Mar 26 '13 at 18:55
    
Hehe, well we can delete these comments now :) –  Matthew Watson Mar 26 '13 at 18:55
    
@Moo-Juice: Mmmm... I agree with you in principle, but the question wan't "what is the Root Of All Evil?"... rather it was "which method is more efficient"... It seems like OP is "entitled" to an answer on that. –  angelatlarge Mar 26 '13 at 19:03
    
@angelatlarge, the problem is that one could easily find this out through simple experimentation as Jason Watkins suggested in the comments. Over 100x100, I very much doubt there's going to be any noticeable difference. My worry is, is that the developer is concentrating on what is currently a non-existent problem (in my eyes, admittedly). Increase the image resolution to 2000x2000 and try and get it to do 1000 attempts in under 5 seconds due to a business requirement... then we can start looking at optimization, or even moving it out of C# altogether :) –  Moo-Juice Mar 26 '13 at 19:06
3  
Why does no one use the full quote We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil. Yet we should not pass up our opportunities in that critical 3%. -- Donald Knuth –  Conrad Frix Mar 26 '13 at 20:08

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