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This should be very simple but it is giving me a hard time in spite of looking.

I have a dataframe with column values a,b,c

a   b   c
t1  10  TRUE
t2   9  TRUE
t3   8  FALSE
t4   7  FALSE
t5   6  FALSE
t6   5  TRUE
t7   4  TRUE
t8   3  TRUE

I need to get the rows in the data frame where c changes from TRUE to FALSE or FALSE to TRUE (rows t3 8 FALSE and t6 5 TRUE).

Seems like an ifelse would do this but I am having trouble figuring out how to do the change part.

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1  
Hi there, since you seem quite new to SO, I would recommend you to read the SO about and also the faq on how SO works on asking questions and accepting answers. – Arun Mar 26 '13 at 20:32
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What Arun is trying to say is that StackOverflow is made much more valuable to everyone if when you receive an answer that solves your problem, you accept it by clicking the little check mark. You are under absolutely no obligation to do so, but it is a great way to "give back" to the site if an answer did in fact solve your problem. – joran Mar 26 '13 at 20:51
    
Thank you Arun and Jordon. Will go and look and make sure I have done this. Thank you. I did read SO about but often things don't stick in old brains. I will try to be attentive to details and I appreciate the comments. Thank you again. – Natalie Bjorklund Mar 27 '13 at 17:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Seems like a task for xor logical operation. The xor operation gives:

#       x     y   xor
# 1  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
# 2  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
# 3 FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
# 4 FALSE FALSE FALSE

Using this, if we take df$c and then xor with c(NA, head(df$c, -1)), the latter of which is a shifted version of df$c, then we get:

#       x     y   xor
# 1  TRUE    NA    NA
# 2  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
# 3 FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
# 4 FALSE FALSE FALSE
# 5 FALSE FALSE FALSE
# 6  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
# 7  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
# 8  TRUE  TRUE FALSE

And here you want those entries that are TRUE. So,

df[with(df, xor(c, c(NA, head(c, -1))) %in% TRUE), ]

#    a b     c
# 3 t3 8 FALSE
# 6 t6 5  TRUE

Even better, we can eliminate the usage of NA and therefore %in% with:

df[with(df, xor(c, c(c[1], head(c, -1)))), ]

#    a b     c
# 3 t3 8 FALSE
# 6 t6 5  TRUE
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+1 this method is new to me. Thanks! – Simon O'Hanlon Mar 26 '13 at 20:33
1  
which would be an alternative to %in% TRUE – mnel Mar 27 '13 at 1:09
    
Oh this worked perfectly! Thank you. – Natalie Bjorklund Mar 27 '13 at 17:24
    
Well I just discovered you can only click the green arrow on one answer. So I clicked this one since this is the one I will use. I can understand this solution and I learned a new thing xor. Plus this answer was all in one row. But really the other one worked just fine to. – Natalie Bjorklund Mar 27 '13 at 17:41

You could use diff which calculates the difference between one value and the next, because TRUE and FALSE are just 1 and 0. If you go from TRUE to FALSE you get -1, if you go from FALSE to TRUE you get 1, if it's just T-T or F-F it will be 0. You can then use this to subset your dataframe using which to select the rows. It boils down to one line (I call your dataframe df)...

df[ which( diff( df$c ) != 0 ) + 1 , ]
#   a b     c
#   3 t3 8 FALSE
#   6 t6 5  TRUE
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This worked! Thank you! – Natalie Bjorklund Mar 27 '13 at 17:25
    
@NatalieBjorklund You are very welcome. :-) – Simon O'Hanlon Mar 27 '13 at 17:26

Here is a rle example:

set.seed(110)
df <- data.frame( a = sample.int(10 , 10 ) , b = sample( c( TRUE , FALSE ) , 10 , repl = TRUE ) )

rles <- rle(df$b)
take <- cumsum(rles$lengths) + 1

df[take[-length(take)], ]
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