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I'm blocking on a weird issue trying to deal with posix threads. I'll start with the code:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <semaphore.h>


typedef struct {
    pthread_mutex_t *mutex; 
} buffer_t;


buffer_t *buffer_alloc(unsigned int maxSize) {

    buffer_t *buffer = (buffer_t *) malloc(sizeof(buffer_t));
    if(buffer == NULL)
        return NULL;

    pthread_mutex_init(buffer->mutex, NULL); // This line causes a crash

    pthread_mutex_t *mutex;
    pthread_mutex_init(mutex, NULL); // This one doesn't

}

I'm getting a segmentation fault on the first pthread_mutex_init(). Here's gdb's runlog and backtrace:

[Thread debugging using libthread_db enabled]
Using host libthread_db library "/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libthread_db.so.1".


Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
__pthread_mutex_init (mutex=0x0, mutexattr=0x0) at pthread_mutex_init.c:83
83  pthread_mutex_init.c: No such file or directory.

(gdb) backtrace
#0  __pthread_mutex_init (mutex=0x0, mutexattr=0x0) at pthread_mutex_init.c:83
#1  0x00000000004015a8 in buffer_alloc (maxSize=10) at buffers.c:26

Thanks for your help !

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The pointer you're passing to pthread_mutex_init() is uninitialized, it doesn't point to allocated memory, so your program invokes undefined behavior. What you can do is modify your struct or the buffer_alloc() function to explicitly allocate memory for the mutex. I. e., solution #1 (I prefer this one):

typedef struct {
    pthread_mutex_t mutex;
} buffer_t;

buffer_t *buffer_alloc(unsigned int maxSize)
{
    buffer_t *buffer = malloc(sizeof(*buffer));
    if (buffer == NULL)
        return NULL;

    pthread_mutex_init(&buffer->mutex, NULL);

    // etc.
    return buffer;
}

Solution #1, dynamic allocation:

typedef struct {
    pthread_mutex_t *mutex;
} buffer_t;

buffer_t *buffer_alloc(unsigned int maxSize)
{
    buffer_t *buffer = malloc(sizeof(*buffer));
    if (buffer == NULL)
        return NULL;

    buffer->mutex = malloc(sizeof(*(buffer->mutex)));
    if (buffer->mutex == NULL) {
        free(buffer);
        return NULL;
    }

    pthread_mutex_init(buffer->mutex, NULL);

    // etc.
    return buffer;
}

In the latter case, don't forget to free() the mutex as well in the "destructor".

Also, don't cast the return value of malloc().

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Change your struct definition to:

typedef struct {
    pthread_mutex_t mutex; 
} buffer_t;

and then the mutex initialization to:

pthread_mutex_init(&buffer->mutex, NULL);

Your code is using an uninitialized pointer in both cases. Not (immediately) causing a segmentation fault in the second case is sheer luck and it will probably corrupt some variables and cause trouble later.

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You're passing in an uninitialized buffer.... you've allocated buffer_t, but initialized it to nothing. So the mutex pointer is some random value pointing to who knows where.

Then, the pthread_mutex_init expects a pointer to a mutex that actually exists. You're passing it a pointer to random memory.

See if this doesn't fix it...

typedef struct {
    pthread_mutex_t mutex; 
} buffer_t;


buffer_t *buffer_alloc(unsigned int maxSize) {

    buffer_t *buffer = (buffer_t *) malloc(sizeof(buffer_t));
    if(buffer == NULL)
        return NULL;

    pthread_mutex_init(&buffer->mutex, NULL); // This line causes a crash
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