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I find that this happens too often in Verilog code:

wire my_module_output_1;
wire my_module_output_2;
wire my_module_output_3;
...

MyModule my_module(
    .output_1(my_module_output_1),
    .output_2(my_module_output_2),
    .output_3(my_module_output_3),
    ...
);

MyOtherModule my_other_module(
    .input_1(my_module_output_1),
    .input_2(my_module_output_2),
    .input_3(my_module_output_3),
    ...
);

What I wish I could do is:

MyModule my_module();
MyOtherModule my_other_module(
    .input_1(my_module.output_1),
    .input_2(my_module.output_2),
    .input_3(my_module.output_3),
    ...
);

Is there any such way for me to achieve the same effect, i.e. to avoid having to repeat myself over and over again every time I need an output from some module wired somewhere?

share|improve this question
    
Not sure I quite understand the example, is there a reason you don't just connect 'some_other_wire' directly to the output port to achieve the same result: .output_1(some_other_wire_1) –  Tim Mar 26 '13 at 19:51
    
@Tim: Sorry, let me change the example... the point is that it's not always possible to do that, e.g. if instead of some_other_wire_1 it's the input of another module, or if you need to be inside an always block, etc. –  Mehrdad Mar 26 '13 at 19:57
    
@Tim: Fixed, does that make more sense? –  Mehrdad Mar 26 '13 at 19:59
1  
Yes, that's better. Unfortunately for you I don't think such a thing exists. The verilog standard does support hierarchical references which allow you to connect directly to wires inside a module without an existing port, but I believe that most synthesizers don't support it and as a coding style I think it's generally frowned upon. –  Tim Mar 26 '13 at 20:04
    
Is this for synthesis? Your second example is valid code. –  user597225 Mar 26 '13 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

Here are a few approaches you can use to reduce the amount of repetition.

The starting point

Here's a simple example that connects two sub-modules. As you noted in your question, there is a lot of repetition required to stitch them together.

module source(output A, output B);
  assign A = 0;
  assign B = 1;
endmodule

module sink(input A, input B);
  initial begin
    #1 $display("A=%0d B=%0d", A, B);
  end
endmodule

module top();

  wire A;
  wire B;

  source the_source(
    .A(A),
    .B(B)
  );

  sink the_sink(
    .A(A),
    .B(B)
  );

endmodule

Using implicit wires

Verilog allows for wires to be declared implicitly. So, as shown below, you don't need to declare A and B as wires. If they appear in a port map, they will be implicitly declared. The only problem with this is that they are always declared as single-bit wires/nets. So while this works fine for single-bit signals, for buses the interconnect still needs to be explicitly declared.

// Verilog, implicit wires
module top();

source the_source(
  .A(A),
  .B(B)
);

sink the_sink(
  .A(A),
  .B(B)
);

endmodule

Using Verilog-Mode AUTOs

The Verilog-Mode emacs package can help tremendously in reducing the amount of typing required to stitch modules together. Here is the example from above using AUTOs.

Before expanding the AUTOs:

// Verilog, explicit connections using AUTOs
module top();

  /*AUTOWIRE*/

  source the_source (/*AUTOINST*/);

  sink the_sink (/*AUTOINST*/);

endmodule

After expanding the AUTOs:

// Verilog, explicit using AUTOs
module top();

  /*AUTOWIRE*/
  // Beginning of automatic wires (for undeclared instantiated-module outputs)
  wire                A;                      // From the_source of source.v
  wire                B;                      // From the_source of source.v
  // End of automatics

  source the_source (/*AUTOINST*/
                     // Outputs
                     .A               (A),
                     .B               (B));

  sink the_sink (/*AUTOINST*/
                 // Inputs
                 .A                   (A),
                 .B                   (B));

endmodule

As Brian pointed out in his answer, you don't need to use emacs to use Verilog-Mode. I also use Vim and use this Vim script to enable Verilog-Mode from within Vim.


SystemVerilog option

If you can use SystemVerilog, you can use the dot-star notation to connect ports by names. This is pretty handy but you still have to declare the wires for interconnects between peer modules.

// SystemVerilog, dot-star notation
module top();

  wire A;
  wire B;

  source the_source(.*);
  sink the_sink(.*);

endmodule
share|improve this answer

Are people still not using Verilog AUTOs everywhere?

http://www.veripool.org/wiki/verilog-mode/Verilog-mode-Help

In particular pay attention to the section on AUTOINST. This isn't going to solve all your problems but judicious use of AUTOs takes a lot of the tedium out of generating structural Verilog.

Don't mind that it's an Emacs node. I'm a vim guy myself but I just pipe my buffer through emacs with this mode loaded when I need my AUTOs updated.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I don't use emacs. +1 though. –  Mehrdad Mar 27 '13 at 2:27

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