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I am calculating the distance (in meters) between "simultaneously" recorded UTM locations, but Im having a problem. The way its written now I'm only calculating the distance between only 1 individual that is "closest in time". I want it to calculate the distance between ALL individuals that are "close" in time.

In my example I have 3 moose individuals and 3 wolves. I want to take moose 1 and calculate the distance between the simultaneously recorded locations of wolf 1 then wolf 2 then wolf 3. Right now the script only searches for the absolute minimum time difference between any wolf and calculates the distance for that 1 wolf instead of all others.

Here's my testing data:

Moose location data:

structure(list(id = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 2L, 2L, 2L), .Label = c("F07001", 
"F07010", "M07012"), class = "factor"), x = c(1482445L, 1481274L, 
1481279L, 1481271L, 1480849L, 1480881L, 1480883L, 1480880L, 1482448L, 
1482494L, 1482534L, 1482534L, 1482553L, 1482555L, 1482414L, 1482852L, 
1476120L, 1476104L, 1476101L), y = c(6621768L, 6619628L, 6619630L, 
6619700L, 6620321L, 6620427L, 6620438L, 6620423L, 6616403L, 6616408L, 
6616395L, 6616408L, 6616406L, 6616418L, 6616755L, 6616312L, 6623655L, 
6623646L, 6623652L), date = structure(c(1173088800, 1173096000, 
1173103260, 1173110400, 1173117600, 1173211200, 1173218400, 1173139200, 
1173088800, 1173096000, 1173103260, 1173110400, 1173117600, 1173211200, 
1173218400, 1173139200, 1173270600, 1173277800, 1173282960), class = c("POSIXct", 
"POSIXt"), tzone = "UTC")), .Names = c("id", "x", "y", "date"
), row.names = c(NA, -19L), class = "data.frame")

Wolf location data:

structure(list(id = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 2L), .Label = c("HF7572", 
"Htest", "UM1347"), class = "factor"), x = c(1480610L, 1480640L, 
1480613L, 1480613L, 1480555L, 1480567L, 1480627L, 1480532L, 1480593L, 
1484394L, 1484394L, 1483940L, 1483933L, 1483935L, 1483930L, 1483855L, 
1483793L, 1483802L, 1484392L, 1483855L), y = c(6619853L, 6619739L, 
6619759L, 6619862L, 6619838L, 6619772L, 6619902L, 6619899L, 6619887L, 
6619589L, 6619602L, 6619899L, 6619907L, 6619905L, 6619896L, 6619834L, 
6619702L, 6619672L, 6619558L, 6619834L), date = structure(c(1173088800, 
1173096060, 1173103440, 1173111600, 1173117780, 1173213600, 1173218400, 
1173141120, 1173266100, 1173095940, 1173099600, 1173103200, 1173106920, 
1173110400, 1173208800, 1173211200, 1173222000, 1173266100, 1173362100, 
1173211200), class = c("POSIXct", "POSIXt"), tzone = "UTC")), .Names = c("id", 
"x", "y", "date"), row.names = c(NA, -20L), class = "data.frame")

Here's my script so far:

mloc=read.csv("moose.csv", head = T)
wloc=read.csv("wolf.csv", head=T)
mloc$date<-as.POSIXct(strptime(mloc$date,"%Y-%m-%d %H:%M"),tz="UTC")
wloc$date<-as.POSIXct(strptime(wloc$date,"%Y-%m-%d %H:%M"),tz="UTC")

#sort the data sequentially by date time then convert to number
Sortmoose = mloc[order(mloc$date),]
Sortwolf = wloc[order(wloc$date),]
m <- as.numeric(Sortmoose$date)
w <- as.numeric(Sortwolf$date)

#Creates index of the time intervals
id <- findInterval(m, w, all.inside=TRUE)
id_min <- ifelse(abs(m-w[id])<abs(m-w[id+1]), id, id+1)
Sortmoose$wolfID = Sortwolf$id[id_min]
Sortmoose$wolfdate =Sortwolf$date[id_min]
Sortmoose$wolfx = Sortwolf$x[id_min]
Sortmoose$wolfy = Sortwolf$y[id_min]
Sortmoose$dist= sqrt((Sortmoose$wolfx-Sortmoose$x)^2+(Sortmoose$wolfy-Sortmoose$y)^2)

I would like to calculate the distance between every moose/wolf pair as long as the location was recorded at the "same" time. I would like the output to have the moose information and the associated wolf information and the distance (in meters) between those two points. I would also like the time difference so I can filter out those that are >45 minutes or something like that but this is something I think I can do later. Basically something like: mooseID mooseDate mooseX mooseY wolfID wolfDate wolfX wolfY Distance(m) TimeDiff (min)

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1  
it would help if you provide a bit more information: 1. Where are moose and wolfes in your dataframes? You are referring to mloc and wloc in your code but your testing data is unnamed. 2. What is the output that you would expect given this test data? –  Victor K. Mar 26 '13 at 20:12
    
@VictorK. I edited the script adding in which data set is which. And what I would expect for the output. –  Kerry Mar 26 '13 at 20:48
    
How large is your data? If it's not too large (say each dataframe is under 1000 rows) then you could simply do cartesian product (i.e. as in my answer below, but without setting the keys) and then filter by time difference. If it's large, you would need to be smarter. –  Victor K. Mar 26 '13 at 21:07
    
@VictorK. looks like we will have to be smarter!! ;) My data set is >400,000 rows. Ive 30 moose and 15 wolves. –  Kerry Mar 26 '13 at 21:10
    
What is the expected result if there are several observations in the same "close" window? If you have a record for a moose, and there are three records for the same wolf within a 45-minute window of the moose record, should the distance be the min, mean, etc. or do you want to see all three? –  dnlbrky Mar 27 '13 at 3:58
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2 Answers

New solution. Here is the code that does what you want (approximate matching). The key idea is to create a new data table with a new column date1 such that for each date = 05:17:13 in the original data it will have date1 = 04:00:00, 05:00:00 and 06:00:00 (and all other columns duplicated) and then to do the merging against this new column. That would guarantee that every two events within one hour of each other in the original data will be merged.

After that we just calculate the distance and time difference.

Please note that using data.table is critical for speed since your data frames are so large - using the regular data.frame will be way too slow.

library(data.table)
library(lubridate)

mloc <- data.table(mloc)
wloc <- data.table(wloc)

# Returns a new data table with one new column (date1) and length(range)
# rows for each row in the initial data table, duplicating all other fields.
# Example: for row with date = '2013-01-15 05:17:23' and for the default range
# argument it will add rows with date1 = '2013-01-15 04:00:00', '2013-01-15 05:00:00'
# and '2013-01-15 06:00:00'
AddTimeBoundaries <- function(dt, range = -1:1) {
  dt1 <- rbindlist(lapply(range, 
             function(x) data.table(id = dt$id, date = dt$date, 
                        date1 = floor_date(dt$date, 'hour') +
                        hours(x))))
  setkey(dt1, id, date)
  setkey(dt, id, date)
  result <- dt[dt1]
  setkey(result, date1)
  result
}

mloc.1 <- AddTimeBoundaries(mloc)
wloc.1 <- AddTimeBoundaries(wloc)

x <- mloc.1[wloc.1, allow.cartesian = TRUE][!is.na(id)]
result <- unique(x[, list(id, date, x, y, id.1, date.1, x.1, y.1, 
              distance = sqrt((x-x.1)^2 + (y-y.1)^2),
              time.diff = date - date.1)])

Result has all the events within 1 hour (and sometimes within 2 hours but you can easily filter those events out).

> head(result, 10)
        id                date       x       y   id.1              date.1     x.1     y.1  distance  time.diff
1: F07001 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1482445 6621768 HF7572 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1480610 6619853 2652.2538     0 secs
2: M07012 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1482448 6616403 HF7572 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1480610 6619853 3909.0592     0 secs
3: F07001 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1482445 6621768 UM1347 2007-03-05 11:59:00 1484394 6619589 2923.4640 -7140 secs
4: M07012 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1482448 6616403 UM1347 2007-03-05 11:59:00 1484394 6619589 3733.2977 -7140 secs
5: F07001 2007-03-05 12:00:00 1481274 6619628 HF7572 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1480610 6619853  701.0856  7200 secs
6: M07012 2007-03-05 12:00:00 1482494 6616408 HF7572 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1480610 6619853 3926.5100  7200 secs
7: F07001 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1482445 6621768 HF7572 2007-03-05 12:01:00 1480640 6619739 2715.6705 -7260 secs
8: F07001 2007-03-05 12:00:00 1481274 6619628 HF7572 2007-03-05 12:01:00 1480640 6619739  643.6435   -60 secs
9: M07012 2007-03-05 10:00:00 1482448 6616403 HF7572 2007-03-05 12:01:00 1480640 6619739 3794.4380 -7260 secs
10: M07012 2007-03-05 12:00:00 1482494 6616408 HF7572 2007-03-05 12:01:00 1480640 6619739 3812.2011   -60 secs

Old solution. This doesn't work as the OP requires an approximate matching of the dates (within 1 hour), not exact.

Assuming I interpreted your question correctly, here is the solution using data.table package. I called the first structure in your testing data mloc and the second one wloc.

Step 1. Convert both data frames to data.table and set key on date:

library(data.table)
mloc <- data.table(mloc)
wloc <- data.table(wloc)
setkey(mloc, date)
setkey(wloc, date)

Step 2. Merge two tables by the date key, creating a "cartesian product" and calculating the distance:

x <- mloc[wloc, allow.cartesian = TRUE][!is.na(id)]
x[, distance := sqrt((x-x.1)^2 + (y-y.1)^2)]

> x
                   date     id       x       y   id.1     x.1     y.1  distance
 1: 2007-03-05 10:00:00 F07001 1482445 6621768 HF7572 1480610 6619853 2652.2538
 2: 2007-03-05 10:00:00 M07012 1482448 6616403 HF7572 1480610 6619853 3909.0592
 3: 2007-03-05 16:00:00 F07001 1481271 6619700 UM1347 1483935 6619905 2671.8759
 4: 2007-03-05 16:00:00 M07012 1482534 6616408 UM1347 1483935 6619905 3767.2019
 5: 2007-03-06 20:00:00 F07001 1480881 6620427 UM1347 1483855 6619834 3032.5443
 6: 2007-03-06 20:00:00 M07012 1482555 6616418 UM1347 1483855 6619834 3655.0042
 7: 2007-03-06 20:00:00 F07001 1480881 6620427  Htest 1483855 6619834 3032.5443
 8: 2007-03-06 20:00:00 M07012 1482555 6616418  Htest 1483855 6619834 3655.0042
 9: 2007-03-06 22:00:00 F07001 1480883 6620438 HF7572 1480627 6619902  593.9966
10: 2007-03-06 22:00:00 M07012 1482414 6616755 HF7572 1480627 6619902 3618.9747
share|improve this answer
    
I was told that date.table doesn't do "forward" looking - so if the closest (in time) wolf loc was "ahead" of the moose loc it wouldn't work. I am hoping this is wrong and will test this now. –  Kerry Mar 26 '13 at 20:53
    
OK, I see what you want now: the timing of the events should not be exactly the same, but close enough (say ~1 hour or so), correct? In this case my solution wouldn't work - it only matches the exact timing. I'll see if I can modify it easily. –  Victor K. Mar 26 '13 at 21:04
    
Yes they should be "close enough" 1 hour or less. This data.table command doesn't calculate for all combinations of moose to wolves. There should at least be as many rows of data as there was initial moose locations, but likely there will be more because each moose has the potential to be near any one of the 3 wolves (if the time is "similar") –  Kerry Mar 26 '13 at 21:09
    
Im liking your solution, but Im getting an error 'Error in [[.default(object, name, exact = TRUE):subscript out of bounds'. Additionally, I am hesitant on rounding the time to the nearest hour. Mostly because at some point I will be doing this with data that has been taken every 5 minutes from both species. So, I would still need to find the "closest" in time at a shorter scale than 1 hour. It needs to be a flexible time window - Where/How can we change your script to accommodate that? –  Kerry Mar 27 '13 at 8:10
    
I figured out my error - I had to add in the commands to format the date column as.POSIXct then worked just fine. I also changed the floor command to round to minute. This seemed to still work, but I am wondering what the range = -1:1 command does?? –  Kerry Mar 27 '13 at 8:25
show 4 more comments

I think I have a partial solution, and it will let you modify the "closeness" window as desired.

# Convert to data.table:
mloc<-as.data.table(mloc)
wloc<-as.data.table(wloc)

# Rename columns to make them less ambiguous:
setnames(mloc,paste0("m",names(mloc)))
setnames(wloc,paste0("w",names(wloc)))

# Adjustable rounding factor:
r <- 45 /60/24 # Need to convert minutes to days

# Add the rounded date column to the two tables:
mloc[,rdate:=round(as.numeric(mdate-as.POSIXct("1970-01-01", tz="GMT"))/r)*r*60*60*24+as.POSIXct("1970-01-01", tz="GMT")]
wloc[,rdate:=round(as.numeric(wdate-as.POSIXct("1970-01-01", tz="GMT"))/r)*r*60*60*24+as.POSIXct("1970-01-01", tz="GMT")]

# Set the keys:
setkey(mloc,rdate)
setkey(wloc,rdate)

# Join the wolf and moose tables on the rounded date:
wloc[mloc, allow.cartesian=T,nomatch=0]

##                  rdate    wid      wx      wy               wdate    mid      mx      my               mdate
## 1: 2007-03-05 09:45:00 HF7572 1480610 6619853 2007-03-05 10:00:00 F07001 1482445 6621768 2007-03-05 10:00:00
## 2: 2007-03-05 09:45:00 HF7572 1480610 6619853 2007-03-05 10:00:00 M07012 1482448 6616403 2007-03-05 10:00:00
## 3: 2007-03-05 12:00:00 UM1347 1484394 6619589 2007-03-05 11:59:00 F07001 1481274 6619628 2007-03-05 12:00:00
## 4: 2007-03-05 12:00:00 HF7572 1480640 6619739 2007-03-05 12:01:00 F07001 1481274 6619628 2007-03-05 12:00:00
## 5: 2007-03-05 12:00:00 UM1347 1484394 6619589 2007-03-05 11:59:00 M07012 1482494 6616408 2007-03-05 12:00:00
## 6: 2007-03-05 12:00:00 HF7572 1480640 6619739 2007-03-05 12:01:00 M07012 1482494 6616408 2007-03-05 12:00:00
## 7: 2007-03-05 14:15:00 UM1347 1483940 6619899 2007-03-05 14:00:00 F07001 1481279 6619630 2007-03-05 14:01:00
## 8: 2007-03-05 14:15:00 HF7572 1480613 6619759 2007-03-05 14:04:00 F07001 1481279 6619630 2007-03-05 14:01:00
## 9: 2007-03-05 14:15:00 UM1347 1483940 6619899 2007-03-05 14:00:00 M07012 1482534 6616395 2007-03-05 14:01:00
##10: 2007-03-05 14:15:00 HF7572 1480613 6619759 2007-03-05 14:04:00 M07012 1482534 6616395 2007-03-05 14:01:00
##11: 2007-03-05 15:45:00 UM1347 1483935 6619905 2007-03-05 16:00:00 F07001 1481271 6619700 2007-03-05 16:00:00
##12: 2007-03-05 15:45:00 UM1347 1483935 6619905 2007-03-05 16:00:00 M07012 1482534 6616408 2007-03-05 16:00:00
##13: 2007-03-05 18:00:00 HF7572 1480555 6619838 2007-03-05 18:03:00 F07001 1480849 6620321 2007-03-05 18:00:00
##14: 2007-03-05 18:00:00 HF7572 1480555 6619838 2007-03-05 18:03:00 M07012 1482553 6616406 2007-03-05 18:00:00
##15: 2007-03-06 20:15:00 UM1347 1483855 6619834 2007-03-06 20:00:00 F07001 1480881 6620427 2007-03-06 20:00:00
##16: 2007-03-06 20:15:00  Htest 1483855 6619834 2007-03-06 20:00:00 F07001 1480881 6620427 2007-03-06 20:00:00
##17: 2007-03-06 20:15:00 UM1347 1483855 6619834 2007-03-06 20:00:00 M07012 1482555 6616418 2007-03-06 20:00:00
##18: 2007-03-06 20:15:00  Htest 1483855 6619834 2007-03-06 20:00:00 M07012 1482555 6616418 2007-03-06 20:00:00
##19: 2007-03-06 21:45:00 HF7572 1480627 6619902 2007-03-06 22:00:00 F07001 1480883 6620438 2007-03-06 22:00:00
##20: 2007-03-06 21:45:00 HF7572 1480627 6619902 2007-03-06 22:00:00 M07012 1482414 6616755 2007-03-06 22:00:00

I said this was partial, since it will miss close matches when one value is rounded up and the other down. For instance, wdate of 2007-03-05 16:20:00 is rounded up to 2007-03-05 16:30:00 and mdate of 2007-03-05 16:00:00 is rounded down to 2007-03-05 15:45:00, so there is no match in the join even though these two events are only 20min apart and the window is 45min.

I have another partial data.table solution that does not round but instead uses roll=-45*60 and roll=45*60 (two results that are then rbindlisted together). It picks up this example record, but looks to have some other issues that I need to investigate...

share|improve this answer
    
I would prefer NOT to round anything. Rounding scares me because the data is not collected at exactly the same time every time. So, if you can come up with something better that would be GREAT. –  Kerry Mar 27 '13 at 13:14
    
I worked out a solution that gets the correct answer, doesn't require any rounding, and can be changed easily to increase/decrease the window. But... it uses the brute force method that requires all combinations of rows from each table. So I don't think it's worth posting. I may still explore the roll option since I've never really had a need for using a roll and I'd like to learn how they work better. But I think that will only give the closest match within the window, rather than all of them like you requested. –  dnlbrky Mar 29 '13 at 1:23
    
wouldn't a loop be OK? People have said to avoid loops, but I can't think of any other way that is intuitive and clean. –  Kerry Mar 30 '13 at 17:59
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