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I'm making a simple bash script. It accepts 2 options (-d and -f). I would like to allow also the long version of this options (-directory and -file). I tried using the curly brackets wildcard but it doesn't work. Any suggestions?

Thanks!

#!/bin/bash

while test $# != 0
do
  case $1 in
  -f)
    # do something
    ;;
  {-d,-directory})
    # do something
    ;;
  *)
    echo "error"
    ;;
  esac
  shift
done
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a pipe symbol:

case $1 in
    -f)
        # do something
        ;;
    -d|-directory)
        # do something
        ;;
    *)
        echo "error"
        ;;
 esac

The various options within a case statement are all shell script patterns, where a pattern can actually be several patterns separated by this pipe symbol |. You can also use regular expressions in this pattern, for example

-[dD]|-directory)

would match both -d, -D and -directory.

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1  
And perhaps you will be interested in getopt for parsing command line parameters. –  Martijn de Milliano Mar 26 '13 at 20:16
    
Thank you very much! –  xonya Mar 26 '13 at 20:37

You can use

-d|-directory)
    # do something
    ;;

But you should think about using a double dash to match 'long options' like in --directory.

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Yes, double dash is better! Thanks –  xonya Mar 26 '13 at 20:38

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