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Im a total beginner in C and here is my problem. In C++ I would look for bad input(not unsigned int) this way:

long double c;
cin >> c;

if (c == (unsigned int) c) {
cout<<"OK";    
}
else
cout<<"NOT OK";

However when now learning C I'm trying to do it the same way, but it does not work:

long double c;
scanf("%lf", &c);

if (c == (unsigned int) c) {
printf("OK\n");    
}
else
printf("NOT OK\n");    

Any advice on how to fix it? My task is to do this by just using scanf and no strings. I don't want negative and float numbers to be inputted. Why doesnt this work?

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2  
Why are you scanning into a long double when you want your input to be unsigned int? –  Xymostech Mar 26 '13 at 21:00
    
@Xymostech "I need check for negative and float numbers." –  Drew Dormann Mar 26 '13 at 21:01
    
@DrewDormann Ah. –  Xymostech Mar 26 '13 at 21:04
    
Im scanning for double so that when I compare (c == (unsigned int) c), here c would still be floating point and not converted to an integer. This way I can check whether the input number was for example "1.2" instead of just "1". –  user2211796 Mar 26 '13 at 21:11
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1 Answer

The conversion directive %lf is for scanning doubles.

To scan long doubles, use %Lf, with an upper case L.

From the specification of fscanf (7.21.6.2)

l (ell) Specifies that a following d, i, o, u, x, X, or n conversion specifier applies to an argument with type pointer to long int or unsigned long int; that a following a, A, e, E, f, F, g, or G conversion specifier applies to an argument with type pointer to double; or that a following c, s, or [ conversion specifier applies to an argument with type pointer to wchar_t.

L Specifies that a following a, A, e, E, f, F, g, or G conversion specifier applies to an argument with type pointer to long double.

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isn't L for long long and l for long ? It still doesnt work. Ty –  user2211796 Mar 26 '13 at 21:01
1  
@user2211796 No, for long long, you use %lld (or %lli) with the ll length modifier. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 26 '13 at 21:03
    
@user2211796 With "it still doesn't work", what exactly do you mean, in how far does it not work? –  Daniel Fischer Mar 26 '13 at 21:05
    
For example if I printf("%Lf", c) in C; it shows 2.00000000 and it go to NOT OK; If I cout c in C++. It shows 2 and goes to OK; –  user2211796 Mar 26 '13 at 21:07
    
What was the input? –  Daniel Fischer Mar 26 '13 at 21:09
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