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I have a query, which returns the following, EXCEPT for the last column, which is what I need to figure out how to create. For each given ObservationID I need to return the date on which the status changes; something like a LEAD() function that would take conditions and not just offsets. Can it be done?

I need to calculate the column Change Date; it should be the last date the status was not the current status.

+---------------+--------+-----------+--------+-------------+
| ObservationID | Region |   Date    | Status | Change Date | <-This field
+---------------+--------+-----------+--------+-------------+
|             1 |     10 | 1/3/2012  | Ice    | 1/4/2012    |
|             2 |     10 | 1/4/2012  | Water  | 1/6/2012    |
|             3 |     10 | 1/5/2012  | Water  | 1/6/2012    |
|             4 |     10 | 1/6/2012  | Gas    | 1/7/2012    |
|             5 |     10 | 1/7/2012  | Ice    |             |
|             6 |     20 | 2/6/2012  | Water  | 2/10/2012   |
|             7 |     20 | 2/7/2012  | Water  | 2/10/2012   |
|             8 |     20 | 2/8/2012  | Water  | 2/10/2012   |
|             9 |     20 | 2/9/2012  | Water  | 2/10/2012   |
|            10 |     20 | 2/10/2012 | Ice    |             |
+---------------+--------+-----------+--------+-------------+
share|improve this question
    
As for the code, I need it to give me a start and end date for each particular status for each region, i.e., how long did the freeze last in Region A? I've tried subqueries which provide me the earliest date for each status but cannot pair them properly with the right change of status. A function similar to LEAD would be ideal, but with further reach than the next record. –  David Mar 26 '13 at 21:53
    
The Ice/Water/Gas isn't the real data, just representative of my issue...the real query is long and would certainly waste your time. It is simple select where the four columns comes from four different tables, with the 'Change Date' being the column I can't create. More apologies if this isn't enough, new to this and don't want to waste your time. –  David Mar 26 '13 at 22:00
    
@David: a lot of SQL questions around here tend to use SQL Fiddle to show your schema setup and what you've tried so far; here's a place to start: sqlfiddle.com/#!4/7e66a/2 Could you add a sample query of what you've tried so far? –  Alkini Mar 26 '13 at 22:14
    
Unfortunately on holiday with fam at moment, cannot test these out...will report promptly next week after trial! –  David Mar 27 '13 at 13:12
    
Dazzal's modeling approach is working, will take on Ronnis and Mike's as well, could clearly use the practice... –  David Apr 1 '13 at 20:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a model clause (10g+) can do this in a compact way:

SQL> create table observation(ObservationID ,  Region  ,obs_date,  Status)
  2  as
  3  select  1, 10, date '2012-03-01', 'Ice' from dual union all
  4  select  2, 10, date '2012-04-01', 'Water' from dual union all
  5  select  3, 10, date '2012-05-01', 'Water' from dual union all
  6  select  4, 10, date '2012-06-01', 'Gas' from dual union all
  7  select  5, 10, date '2012-07-01', 'Ice' from dual union all
  8  select  6, 20, date '2012-06-02', 'Water' from dual union all
  9  select  7, 20, date '2012-07-02', 'Water' from dual union all
 10  select  8, 20, date '2012-08-02', 'Water' from dual union all
 11  select  9, 20, date '2012-09-02', 'Water' from dual union all
 12  select 10, 20, date '2012-10-02', 'Ice' from dual ;

Table created.

SQL> select ObservationID, obs_date, Status, status_change
  2            from observation
  3          model
  4          dimension by (Region, obs_date, Status)
  5          measures ( ObservationID, obs_date obs_date2, cast(null as date) status_change)
  6          rules (
  7            status_change[any,any,any] = min(obs_date2)[cv(Region), obs_date > cv(obs_date), status != cv(status)]
  8          )
  9   order by 1;

OBSERVATIONID OBS_DATE  STATU STATUS_CH
------------- --------- ----- ---------
            1 01-MAR-12 Ice   01-APR-12
            2 01-APR-12 Water 01-JUN-12
            3 01-MAY-12 Water 01-JUN-12
            4 01-JUN-12 Gas   01-JUL-12
            5 01-JUL-12 Ice
            6 02-JUN-12 Water 02-OCT-12
            7 02-JUL-12 Water 02-OCT-12
            8 02-AUG-12 Water 02-OCT-12
            9 02-SEP-12 Water 02-OCT-12
           10 02-OCT-12 Ice

fiddle: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!4/f6687/1

i.e. we will dimension on region, date and status as we want to look at cells with the same region, but get the first date that the status differs on.

we also have to measure date too so i created an alias obs_date2 to do that, and we want a new column status_change to hold the date the status changed.

this line is the line that does all the working out for us:

status_change[any,any,any] = min(obs_date2)[cv(Region), obs_date > cv(obs_date), status != cv(status)]

it says, for our three dimensions, only look at the rows with the same region (cv(Region),) and look at rows where the date follows the date of the current row (obs_date > cv(obs_date)) and also the status is different from the current row (status != cv(status)) finally get the minimum date that satisfies this set of conditions (min(obs_date2)) and assign it to status_change. The any,any,any part on the left means this calculation applies to all rows.

share|improve this answer
    
Dazzal, I tried this approach first and it is working like a charm. Just had to add a Unique Single Reference to it after adapting it to the real data. And I've taken the first step towards modeling! –  David Apr 1 '13 at 20:33
    
Many many thanks, will find out how to give proper site kudos to you. –  David Apr 1 '13 at 20:34
    
@David you just tick the answer if it solves your question –  DazzaL Apr 2 '13 at 20:59

I've tried many times to understand the MODEL clause and never really quite managed it, so thought I would add another solution

This solution takes some of what Ronnis has done but instead uses the IGNORE NULLS clause of the LEAD function. I think that this is only new with Oracle 11 but you could probably replace it with the FIRST_VALUE function for Oracle 10 if necessary.

select
  observation_id,
  region,
  observation_date,
  status,
  lead(case when is_change = 'Y' then observation_date end) ignore nulls 
    over (partition by region order by observation_date) as change_observation_date
from (
  select
    a.observation_id,
    a.region,
    a.observation_date,
    a.status,
    case 
      when status = lag(status) over (partition by region order by observation_date) 
        then null
        else 'Y' end as is_change
       from observations a
)
order by 1
share|improve this answer
    
How many roads to Rome? Much obliged, Mike, results for me next week –  David Mar 27 '13 at 13:17

I frequently do this when cleaning up overlapping from/to-dates and duplicate rows. Your case is much simpler though, since you only have the "from-date" :)

Setting up the test data

create table observations(
   observation_id   number       not null
  ,region           number       not null
  ,observation_date date         not null
  ,status           varchar2(10) not null
);


insert 
  into observations(observation_id, region, observation_date, status)
   select 1,  10, date '2012-03-01', 'Ice'   from dual union all
   select 2,  10, date '2012-04-01', 'Water' from dual union all
   select 3,  10, date '2012-05-01', 'Water' from dual union all
   select 4,  10, date '2012-06-01', 'Gas'   from dual union all
   select 5,  10, date '2012-07-01', 'Ice'   from dual union all
   select 6,  20, date '2012-06-02', 'Water' from dual union all
   select 7,  20, date '2012-07-02', 'Water' from dual union all
   select 8,  20, date '2012-08-02', 'Water' from dual union all
   select 9,  20, date '2012-09-02', 'Water' from dual union all
   select 10, 20, date '2012-10-02', 'Ice'   from dual;

commit;

The below query has three points of interest:

  1. Identifying repeated information (the recording show the same as previous recording)
  2. Ignoring the repeated recordings
  3. Determining the date from the "next" change

.

with lagged as(
   select a.*
         ,case when status = lag(status, 1) over(partition by region 
                                                     order by observation_date) 
               then null 
               else rownum 
           end as change_flag -- 1
     from observations a
)
select observation_id
      ,region
      ,observation_date
      ,status
      ,lead(observation_date, 1) over(
         partition by region 
             order by observation_date
      ) as change_date --3
      ,lead(observation_date, 1, sysdate) over(
         partition by region 
             order by observation_date
      ) - observation_date as duration
  from lagged
 where change_flag is not null -- 2
 ;
share|improve this answer
    
Ronnis, big thanks, will try this out and let you all know next week –  David Mar 27 '13 at 13:16

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