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script code:

    echo "Command?"
    read command

for example command = echo "Hello world"

    $command > text.txt
    cat text.txt

The output is "Hello world" (with inverted commas), but I need the same output as gives simple

    echo "Hello world" > text.txt

i.e. Hello world. How can I get it? Please keep in mind that $command can take any values, must execute in the current bash and the output saved in file.

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"USE MORE QUOTES!" They are vital. Also, learn the difference between ' and " and `. See mywiki.wooledge.org/Quotes and wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/words –  StardustOne Mar 26 '13 at 21:24
    
I'm not sure what it is you want to do. is it echo "$command" > text.txt ? –  suspectus Mar 26 '13 at 21:26
    
to be safer: can't you propose instead a list of available commands, and have the user input the number of that command? That way you don't accept "everything" (if accepting everything, clever/evil users can do almost everything with your script. VERY VERY difficult to sanitize every possible inputs) –  Olivier Dulac Mar 26 '13 at 22:12
    
the user is root =) –  Olga Mar 26 '13 at 22:27

2 Answers 2

You can use

eval "$command" > text.txt

But be careful - what if someone enters rm -rf /?

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thanks choroba! if someone enters rm -rf / it will be his problem :D I need to write a code that takes commands from a shell, stores them like variable, executes, and saves stdout or stderr –  Olga Mar 26 '13 at 21:34

If you need to eval a command and then save STDOUT or STDERR :

For STDOUT :

eval "$command" > text.txt

And for STDERR :

eval "$command" 2> text.txt

But, take care, eval is a common misspelling of 'evil'. If eval is the answer, surely you are asking the wrong question. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/048

Last but not least, "USE MORE QUOTES!" They are vital. Also, learn the difference between ' and " and `. See mywiki.wooledge.org/Quotes and wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/words

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I just found that if $command=clear and I use eval "$command" > text.txt the current bash window will not be cleaned =( –  Olga Mar 26 '13 at 21:47
    
@Olga : it is because "clear" works by sending to STDOUT the necessary stuff to clear that stdout. If you redirect STDOUT to "text.txt", those commands are sent to "text.txt" and no longer to the original STDOUT (ie, the terminal). If you want to BOTH send to the original STDOUT and to "file.txt" : use: command | tee file.txt –  Olivier Dulac Mar 26 '13 at 22:10
    
yes, I already found that tee is good in my script =) –  Olga Mar 26 '13 at 22:31

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