Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a simple FTP client/server setup. The client is supposed to be able to retrieve a file from the server and place the result as a stream of bytes into /retr_files/filex. The appropriate responses are sent from the server, and file1 is indeed created in the folder. However, too many bytes were sent (or received). I tested this on a 9.6kB file and the file it made client-side was 16.6kB. Odd. I feel like I'm missing something obvious here, can someone help me out? Thanks!

Relevant code:

Client:

BufferedReader inFromServer_d = null;

    if(welcomeSocket!=null){
        if(!welcomeSocket.isClosed()){
            welcomeSocket.close();
        }
    }

    try {
        welcomeSocket = new ServerSocket(port);
        System.out.print("PORT " + myIP + "," + num1 + "," + num2 + "\r\n");
        out.writeBytes("PORT " + myIP + "," + num1 + "," + num2 + "\r\n");
        System.out.print(parseReply(getResponse()));
        System.out.print("RETR " + pathname + "\r\n");
        out.writeBytes("RETR " + pathname + "\r\n");
        String reply = parseReply(getResponse());
        if (reply.charAt(10)=='1') {
            System.out.print(reply);
            System.out.print(parseReply(getResponse()));

            try{
                clientSocket_d = welcomeSocket.accept();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                System.out.print("GET failed, FTP-data port not allocated.\r\n");
                System.exit(-1);
            }


                inFromServer_d = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                        clientSocket_d.getInputStream()));


            // READ
            BufferedReader bufferedReader = inFromServer_d;
            FileWriter output = new FileWriter("retr_files/file" + retrCnt);
            BufferedWriter bufferedWriter = new BufferedWriter(output);

            String length;
            while ((length = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
                bufferedWriter.write(length + "\n");
            }

            bufferedReader.close();
            bufferedWriter.close();
            clientSocket_d.close();

Server:

//TCP CONNECT
                        DataOutputStream outToClient_d = null;
                        Socket clientSocket1 = null;


                        try {
                            ipAddress = ipAddress.substring(0, ipAddress.length()-1);
                        clientSocket1 = new Socket(ipAddress, portNumber);
                        outToClient_d = new DataOutputStream(clientSocket1.getOutputStream());
                        }

                        catch(UnknownHostException e){
                          out.writeBytes("425 Can not open data connection.\r\n");
                        }



                        BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(input);

                        String length;
                        while((length = bufferedReader.readLine())!=null){
                            outToClient_d.writeBytes(length+"\n");
                        }
                        out.writeBytes("250 Requested file action completed.\r\n");
                        bufferedReader.close();
                        clientSocket1.close();
                        outToClient_d.close();

}

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't use Readers and Writers and readLine(). All files are not text files, and not all text files have line breaks. Use streams.

share|improve this answer
    
Haha that makes perfect sense. Thanks! –  Haskell Mar 26 '13 at 22:57

I guess at your client side , the newly created file must have extra new line between each printed lines. That might lead to increase in size of file. AT client side replace this line :

bufferedWriter.write(length + "\n");

To

bufferedWriter.write(length);
share|improve this answer
    
The newLine was removed by readLine(), but he shouldn't be doing any of this. –  EJP Mar 26 '13 at 21:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.