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Alternatively, duplicate of Facing an error — glibc detected free invalid next size (fast).

I have a struct called bond which is defined as follows:

typedef struct{
    int type1;
    int type2;
    int id_1;
    int id_2;
    float dist;
} bond;

I am allocating an array of these structs in a nested loop and freeing it periodically. However, for some reason I am getting a free() Invalid Next size error. The code is below:

while(i<(C.num_type_A+C.num_type_B)){//1a
    bond_arr=(bond*)malloc(100*sizeof(bond));

    a=-N1;
    while(a<=N1){//2a

        b=-N2;
        while(b<=N2){//3a

            c=-N3;
            while(c<=N3){//4a

                j=0;
                while(j<(C.num_type_A+C.num_type_B)){//5a

                    //if the same atom do nothing
                    if((i==j)&&(a==0)&&(b==0)&&(c==0)){//6a
                        j=j+1;
                    }//6b
                    else{//7a

                        //calculate bond length
                        bondlength=calc_dist(a,b,c,i,j,C);

                        if(bondlength<=cutoff){//8a
                            //store bond
                            temp_bond.type1=((i+1)<=C.num_type_A);
                            temp_bond.type2=((j+1)<=C.num_type_B);
                            temp_bond.id_1=i;
                            temp_bond.id_2=j;
                            temp_bond.dist=bondlength;
                            bond_arr[n]=temp_bond;
                            n=n+1;

                            //if out of memory allocate twice as much
                            if(n==(nmax-1)){//9a
                                printf("begin\n");
                                temp_ptr=realloc(bond_arr,sizeof(bond)*2*nmax);
                                printf("end\n");

                                if(temp_ptr==NULL){
                                    printf("Memory allocation failed\n");
                                }
                                else{
                                    bond_arr=temp_ptr;
                                }
                                nmax=2*nmax;
                            }//9b
                        }//8b
                    }//7b
                    j=j+1;
                }//5b
                c=c+1;
            }//4b
            b=b+1;
        }//3b
        a=a+1;
    }//2b

    //sort bonds and update LI index
    sort_bonds(bond_arr,n);
    f=update_LI(bond_arr,LIcurr,n);
    LIcurr=f;
    printf("%d\n",n);
    free(bond_arr);
    n=0;
    i=i+1;
}//1b
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closed as off-topic by nneonneo, Oli Charlesworth, Andrew Medico, Kerrek SB, Deduplicator Apr 30 at 1:28

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – Andrew Medico, Kerrek SB
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9  
Holy nesting batman! –  Ron Dahlgren Mar 26 '13 at 21:57
2  
If you're on Linux, run it with Valgrind to find the problem. You most likely ran over the bounds of an array somewhere and trashed malloc's bookkeeping information. –  nneonneo Mar 26 '13 at 21:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It looks like the realloc logic might be to blame. The initial allocation of size 100. Then it is grown when n reaches nmax-1. The initial value of nmax is not shown (that I see). Even if it starts at 100, it is not reset at the top of the loop. So if n ever grows past 100 and causes a realloc, then nmax is doubled and would no longer match the original size of 100.

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