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I tried this:

for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    for(j=i+1;j<5;j++)
    {
        break(2);
    }
    alert(1)
};

only to get:

SyntaxError: missing ; before statement

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2  
break ( 2) ; :o what do you mean by 2, break can't have any arguments –  Rakesh Juyal Oct 14 '09 at 7:51
2  
Line 7 is missing a semicolon after alert(1). –  Nathan Taylor Oct 14 '09 at 8:18
17  
@Nathan Taylor: semicolons are optional in JavaScript, but considered good style –  Tim Büthe Oct 14 '09 at 8:41
    
Near duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/183161/149391 –  Joey Adams Jun 13 '12 at 9:57

11 Answers 11

up vote 253 down vote accepted

You should be able to break to a label, like so:

function foo ()
{
    dance:
    for(var k = 0; k < 4; k++){
        for(var m = 0; m < 4; m++){
            if(m == 2){
                break dance;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
8  
@Aaron, JavaScript has labels also. –  Brian Gianforcaro Oct 14 '09 at 7:51
8  
It's still ugly. ;) –  Glenn Oct 14 '09 at 7:52
8  
How is it ugly at all? it's powerful and elegant. –  Brian Gianforcaro Oct 14 '09 at 7:56
6  
Okay. I tried to undo the -1 but SO won't let me :( –  Aaron Digulla Oct 14 '09 at 8:24
6  
@Aaron, edit the answer (trivially, e.g., put a space between a ')' and '{' characters) then reverse your downvote quick as you can. You can't reverse downvotes over a certain age unless the answer is edited. –  paxdiablo Oct 14 '09 at 8:43

You need to name your outer loop and break that loop, rather than your inner loop - like this.

outer_loop: 
for(i=0;i<5;i++) {
    for(j=i+1;j<5;j++) {
    	break outer_loop;
    }
    alert(1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I didn't know we can name loops, great info! +1 –  o.k.w Oct 14 '09 at 7:53
8  
@o.k.w: you don't name the loop. You just label a position in the source. –  xtofl Oct 14 '09 at 8:02
2  
Never knew JavaScript supported labels. I wonder why I've never seen that before. :O –  Nathan Taylor Oct 14 '09 at 8:19
6  
@xtofl: Not exactly. You associate a label with a statement (which could be a loop) by placing it immediately before. It's only useful with a block statement, since the label is only available with the break and continue statements within the block. –  Tim Down Oct 14 '09 at 8:48
2  
@NickFitz: you could make a performance argument for it. In the case of nested loops labels could be useful to break out of an outer loop. While it may more elegant and modular to avoid nested loops by moving inner loops to separate functions, it will run marginally slower because of the extra function calls. –  Tim Down Oct 14 '09 at 10:39

See Aaron's. Otherwise: j=5;i=5 instead of break.

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​N​i​c​e​ one!​ –  Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 25 '12 at 3:40
    
this is truly a solution. very brilliant !!! –  Nathanphan Jan 30 '13 at 19:50
loop1:
    for (var i in set1) {
loop2:
        for (var j in set2) {
loop3:
            for (var k in set3) {
                break loop2;  // breaks out of loop3 and loop2
            }
        }
    }

code copied from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/183161/best-way-to-break-from-nested-loops-in-javascript/183197#183197

Please search before posting a question. The link was the FIRST related question I saw on the left side of this page!

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Unfortunately you'll have to set a flag or use labels (think old school goto statements)

var breakout = false;

for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    for(j=i+1;j<5;j++)
    {
        breakout = true;
        break;
    }
    if (breakout) break;
    alert(1)
};

The label approach looks like:

end_loops:
for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    for(j=i+1;j<5;j++)
    {
        break end_loops;
    }
    alert(1)
};

edit: label incorrectly placed.

also see:

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In my opinion, it's important to keep your construct vocabulary to a minimum. If I can do away with breaks and continues easily, I do so.

function foo ()
{
    var found = false;
    for(var k = 0; (k < 4 && !found); k++){
        for(var m = 0; (m < 4 && !found); m++){
           if( m === 2){
               found = true;
           }
        }
    }
    return found;
}

Be warned, after the loop, m and k are one larger that you might think. This is because m++ and k++ are executed before their loop conditions. However, it's still better than 'dirty' breaks.

EDIT: long comment @Dennis...

I wasn't being 100% serious about being 'dirty', but I still think that 'break' contravenes my own conception of clean code. The thought of having multi-level breaks actually makes me feel like taking a shower.

I find justifying what I mean about a feeling about code because I have coded all life. The best why I can think of it is is a combination of manners and grammar. Breaks just aren't polite. Multi level breaks are just plain rude.

When looking at a for statement, a reader knows exactly where to look. Everything you need to know about the rules of engagement are in the contract, in between the parenthesis. As a reader, breaks insult me, it feels like I've been cheated upon.

Clarity is much more respectful than cheating.

share|improve this answer
    
Why should you need to keep your construct vocab to a minimum? The argument that breaks are 'dirty' is absurd. In terms of readability, your solution is much worse, and it performs no better. You have a point though, like any construct, breaks can be abused, but a bit of cheating here or there for readability purposes is definitely okay. –  Dennis Hodapp Jul 10 '12 at 21:41
    
too long to fit into a comment to i did an edit. –  tomwrong Jul 13 '12 at 12:06
    
Also, keeping construct vocabulary to a minimum is more of a result of switching between many languages frequently. You tend to use more language that is common between them. In the case of JavaScript, this has the benefit of making the code compatible across systems and also benefits readers who may not use JavaScript as their primary language. –  tomwrong Jul 13 '12 at 12:37
1  
+1 for a different approach. It's good to have options –  Phil Strong Aug 30 '12 at 12:17
    
welcome to the Karma train. –  tomwrong Aug 30 '12 at 13:44

Use function for multilevel loops - this is good way:

function find_dup () {
    for (;;) {
        for(;;) {
            if (done) return;
        }
    }
}
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Wooo, what the heck is for(;;)? Never seen that before. –  Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 25 '12 at 3:38
1  
Infinity loop :) it's like while (true) {} –  Anatoliy Feb 25 '12 at 14:04

break doesn't take parameters. There are two workarounds:

  1. Wrap them in a function and call return

  2. Set a flag in the inner loop and break again right after the loop if the flag is set.

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15  
Actually, it does take parameters. :) developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/… –  deceze Oct 14 '09 at 7:51
    
Does that work in IE? –  Aaron Digulla Oct 14 '09 at 8:22
3  
Aaron: I just tested in IE6; it does :) –  Noon Silk Oct 14 '09 at 8:30

Wrap in a self executing function and return

(function(){
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        for (j=0;j<3;j++){
            //console.log(i+' '+j);
            if (j == 2) return;
        }
    }
})()
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Break 1st loop:

for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
  for(j=i+1;j<5;j++)
  {
    //do something

    break;
  }
  alert(1);
};

Break both loops:

for(i=0;i<5;i++)
{
  var breakagain = false;
  for(j=i+1;j<5;j++)
  {
    //do something

    breakagain = true;
    break;
  }
  alert(1);
  if(breakagain)
    break;
};
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function myFunction(){
  for(var i = 0;i < n;i++){
    for(var m = 0;m < n;m++){
      if(/*break condition*/){
        goto out;
      }
    }
  }
out:
 //your out of the loop;
}
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2  
In Javascript, "goto" may be a reserved word, but it doesn't actually do anything... –  NickFitz Oct 14 '09 at 9:51
    
Downvoted, same reason as NickFitz. –  Tim Down Oct 14 '09 at 11:27
    
@NickFitz, nope, goto is not a reserved word in JavaScript: ReferenceError: goto is not defined –  Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 25 '12 at 3:42
    
@Derek朕會功夫 It's a "future reserved word" (in some ECMAScript standards), i.e. it's not implemented yet but might be in the future. –  Juhana Jan 24 at 17:58

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