Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm writing an application that requires me to split a large image into small tiles, where each tile is essentially a cropped version of the original image.

Currently my split operation looks something like this

tile.Image = new BitmapImage();
tile.Image.BeginInit();
tile.Image.UriSource = OriginalImage.UriSource;
tile.Image.SourceRect = new Int32Rect(x * tileWidth + x, y * tileHeight, tileWidth, tileHeight);
tile.Image.EndInit();

Intuitively, I thought that this would create basically a "reference" to the original image, and would just display as a sub rectangle of the image. However, the slow speed at which my split operation performs has lead me to believe that this is actually copying the source rect of the original image, which is very slow for large images (There is a noticeable 3-4 second pause when splitting a decent size image).

I looked around a bit but haven't been able to find a way to draw a bitmap as a sub rect of a large image, without copying any data. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried creating a new Bitmap and blitting into it? I think that might be faster than trying to crop the image inline. – Mike Caron Mar 26 '13 at 22:14
    
Your tile class could store a reference to the original image and a rectangle to copy when drawing itself? Graphics.DrawImage has overloads to draw a portion of a bitmap: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3tf158xz.aspx – Blorgbeard Mar 26 '13 at 22:15
    
I'm admittedly not an expert on image manipulation, but I'm not sure what you're asking for makes sense. While there may be a mechanism to hide the copy, I suspect the image data need to be "realigned" (copied) in memory either way. – svidgen Mar 26 '13 at 22:17
    
Clarifying my last comment, I'm just thinking about the internal storage format -- it's likely just a byte array. Simplifying a great deal, a 4x4 image is ABCD EFGH IJKL MNOP in memory, for instance. If you want the 2x2 on the top left, for instance, you need a new byte array like ABEF. It's not a subarray. – svidgen Mar 26 '13 at 22:21
    
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". – John Saunders Mar 27 '13 at 1:00
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use the System.Windows.Media.Imaging.CroppedBitmap class:

// Create a CroppedBitmap from the original image.
Int32Rect rect = new Int32Rect(x * tileWidth + x, y * tileHeight, tileWidth, tileHeight);
CroppedBitmap croppedBitmap = new CroppedBitmap(originalImage, rect);

// Create an Image element.
Image tileImage = new Image();
tileImage.Width = tileWidth;
tileImage.Height = tileHeight;
tileImage.Source = croppedBitmap;
share|improve this answer
1  
Earlier I commented that this didn't increase performance that much but I just tried the old way again and this does in fact produce a significant performance gain (from close to 6 seconds for a split to more like 1 second). – phosphoer Mar 27 '13 at 22:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.