Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am puzzled on this code snippet:

#include <climits>
#include <iostream>
int main(void) {
    using namespace std;
    cout << "long max " << LONG_MAX << endl;
    long x = 2 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024;
    cout << "2 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024 = " << x << endl;
    return 0;
}

I was expecting 2147483648 as it should be, instead I am getting. Using unsigned doesn't seem to help. what gives?

long max 9223372036854775807
2 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024 = -2147483648
share|improve this question
    
if you type 1024, it already has a data type, in this language being integer. That is why you need to specify 1024L if you want long datatype. –  eis Mar 26 '13 at 22:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Add some Ls*. long x = 2L * 1024L * 1024L * 1024L;

(Technically, as long as one literal is of type long the others will be promoted to long)

The overflow happens because 2, etc. is of type int by default and the overflow happens before the assignment.

See integer literals which explains the different literals.

share|improve this answer
1  
And the signed int has a maximum of (2^31) - 1, so 2^31 overflows that by one. (just to make it more complete). –  scones Mar 26 '13 at 22:59
    
I mistakenly thought the upcast will take care of it, apparently not. thx –  Oliver Mar 26 '13 at 23:00
    
@Oliver: The overflow happens before the assignment. Also, note that signed integer overflow is undefined behavior in C++. –  Jesse Good Mar 26 '13 at 23:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.