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public class test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
   int total = 2;
   int rn = 1;
   double rnp = (rn / total) * 100;
   System.out.println(rnp);
 }
}

Why it prints 0.0 instead of 50.0?

https://www.google.com/search?q=100*(1%2F2)&aq=f&oq=100*(1%2F2)

share|improve this question
    
Because 1/2 is 0 in integer division. – corsiKa Mar 26 '13 at 23:05
    
possible duplicate of Division in Java always results in zero (0)? – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 26 '13 at 23:06
1  
Also could be considered duplicate of C programming division considering the answer is the same. – corsiKa Mar 26 '13 at 23:08
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The division occurs in integer space with no notion of fractions, you need something like

double rnp = (rn / (double) total) * 100
share|improve this answer

You are invoking integer division here

(rn / total)

Integer division rounds towards zero.

Try this instead:

double rnp = ((double)rn / total) * 100;
share|improve this answer
1  
Look closer. The cast is before the division. – Kyurem Mar 26 '13 at 23:08
    
@Johan, the cast in this place still works. – rgettman Mar 26 '13 at 23:09
    
Turns out your eye for observation is better than mine :) – Johan Sjöberg Mar 26 '13 at 23:12

In java, and most other programming languages, when you divide two integers, the result is also an integer. The remainder is discarded. Thus, 1 / 2 returns 0. If you want a float or double value returned, you need to do something like 1 * 1.0 / 2, which will return 0.5. Multiplying or dividing an integer by a double or float converts it to that format.

share|improve this answer
public class test
{
  public static void main(String[] args) 
  {
   int total = 2;
   int rn = 1;
   double rnp = (rn / (float)total) * 100;
   System.out.println(rnp);
 }
}
share|improve this answer

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