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When I'm inputting data in curr->data I first allocate memory by doing curr = (NODE*) malloc (sizeof(NODE));. Then I build list and eventually at the end, print it. Somewhere in the program I have to free the memory that I've used, but I don't know when to do it. After building the list, or after I print the list? or can I do this?

printf("How many elements do you want to make? ");
scanf("%d", &NumElem);
head = NULL;
for (i = 0; i < NumElem; i++)
{
    //memory allocate
    curr = (NODE*)malloc(sizeof(NODE));
    printf("Number %d: ", i+1);
    scanf("%d", &curr->num);
    FLUSH;

    if (head == NULL)/*beginning of the list*/
    {
        curr->next = head;
        head = curr;
        *tail = curr;
    }
    else /*adding on the list*/
    {
        curr->next = head;
        head = curr;
    }
    free (curr);
}//for 

Can I free each time after I put data inside the current node?

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1  
When you're done using it. In this case you're not done using it - even if you're done for the loop. If you free it then tail and head (e.g.) now points to junk as the object ha been freed. –  user166390 Mar 26 '13 at 23:37
1  
You cannot reference memory again once you have freed it, as the contents will be undefined. After you have done what you need to with the list (printing it I suppose), then traverse the list, freeing each node along the way. –  Ron Dahlgren Mar 26 '13 at 23:38
    
Quite important: What is FLUSH;? –  undefined behaviour Mar 27 '13 at 0:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Suppose you're reserved a local meeting room where you plan to have a meeting and then a party. When would you release your reservation ... immediately after you reserved it, after you've had the meeting but before you've had the party, or after you've had both the meeting and the party?

malloc and free are like that ... malloc reserves an area of memory for your use and free cancels the reservation. If you continue to use the memory after you've cancelled the reservation, the behavior is undefined.

In your case, you need to free your entire list of nodes. You can do that in a loop, but there's a common trap: freeing a node before accessing its next pointer. The danger is that this almost always works in practice, but it's undefined and sometimes it won't work ... possibly in some software controlling life-critical machinery. Best to learn to do it right now:

void free_list(NODE* list)
{
    while (list)
    {
        NODE* next = list->next;
        free(list);
        list = next;
    }
}

Or in a slightly more compact form,

void free_list(NODE* list)
{
    for (NODE* next; list; list = next)
    {
        next = list->next;
        free(list);
    }
}

If your node contain pointers to strings or other objects that were malloced and need to be freed, those free calls would be done in free_list before freeing the node itself.

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