Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to write a C function that will print 1 to N one per each line on the stdout where N is a int parameter to the function. The function should not use while, for, do-while loops, goto statement, recursion, and switch statement. Is it possible? I want to find an answer to this as this a challenge question

share|improve this question
3  
Out of curiosity, why? –  phoebus Oct 14 '09 at 8:18
13  
If it's a challenge question and we give you an answer, the challenge will be spoiled. –  Daniel Daranas Oct 14 '09 at 8:23
26  
printf("1 to N"); –  Vadakkumpadath Oct 14 '09 at 8:30
5  
Does system(("MyExe %d",N-1)) count as recursion ? :P –  MSalters Oct 14 '09 at 8:55
4  
Use inline assembly, and you're done. –  Michael Foukarakis Oct 14 '09 at 9:22

16 Answers 16

up vote 15 down vote accepted

With blocking read, signals and alarm. I thought I'd have to use sigaction and SA_RESTART, but it seemed to work well enough without.

Note that setitimer/alarm probably are unix/-like specific.

#include <signal.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

volatile sig_atomic_t counter;
volatile sig_atomic_t stop;

void alarm_handler(int signal)
{
  printf("%d\n", counter++);
  if ( counter > stop )
  {
    exit(0);
  }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  struct itimerval v;
  v.it_value.tv_sec = 0;
  v.it_value.tv_usec = 5000;
  v.it_interval.tv_sec = 0;
  v.it_interval.tv_usec = 5000;
  int pipefds[2];
  char b;

  stop = 10;
  counter = 1;

  pipe(pipefds);

  signal(SIGALRM, alarm_handler);

  setitimer(ITIMER_REAL, &v, NULL);

  read(pipefds[0], &b, 1);
}
share|improve this answer
14  
Not standard C but I won't vote you down since anyone bizarre enough to come up with this solution, is probably psychotic enough to track me down and cause serious harm :-) –  paxdiablo Oct 14 '09 at 11:37
1  
@paxdiablo: yes, fear my nerd physique! Also, adding insult to injury, C99 states that calling i.e. printf within a signal-handler might not be entirely defined. :) –  Kjetil Joergensen Oct 14 '09 at 12:57
 #include "stdio.h"

 #include "stdlib.h"

 #include "signal.h"

 int g_num;

 int iterator;

 void signal_print()

 {

        if(iterator>g_num-1)

                exit(0);

        printf("%d\n",++iterator);

 }

 void myprintf(int n)

 {

     g_num=n;

        int *p=NULL;

     int x= *(p); // the instruction is reexecuted after handling the signal

 }

 int main()

 {

        signal(SIGSEGV,signal_print);

        int n;

        scanf("%d",&n);

        myprintf(n);

        return 0;

 }
share|improve this answer
int x=1;

void PRINT_2(int);

void PRINT_1(int n)
{ if(x>n)
    return;
  printf("%d\n",x++);
  PRINT_2(n);  
}

void PRINT_2(int n)
{ if(x>n)
    return;
  printf("%d\n",x++);
  PRINT_1(n);  
}

int main() 
{   int n;
    scanf("%d",&n);
    if(n>0)
      PRINT_1(n);
    system("pause");
}
share|improve this answer
    /// <summary>
    /// Print one to Hundred without using any loop/condition.
    /// </summary>
    int count = 100;
    public void PrintOneToHundred()
    {
        try
        {
            int[] hey = new int[count];
            Console.WriteLine(hey.Length);
            count--;
            PrintOneToHundred();
        }
        catch
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Done Printing");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
He's also not allowed to use recursion –  MattDavey Jan 31 '11 at 13:42
    
Also, why create a new array[count] and print the length, why not just print count and skip the array altogether? –  MattDavey Jan 31 '11 at 13:43

Another thingy (on linux) would be to do as below where 7 is N

int main() {
    return system("seq 7");
}
share|improve this answer

This takes the integer N from the command line and prints out from 1 to N

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int total;
int N;

int print16(int n)
{
    printf("%d\n",n+0x01); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x02); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x03); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x04); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x05); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x06); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x07); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x08); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x09); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x0A); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x0B); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x0C); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x0D); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x0E); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x0F); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
    printf("%d\n",n+0x10); total++; if (total >= N) exit(0);
}

int print256(int n)
{
    print16(n);
    print16(n+0x10);
    print16(n+0x20);
    print16(n+0x30);
    print16(n+0x40);
    print16(n+0x50);
    print16(n+0x60);
    print16(n+0x70);
    print16(n+0x80);
    print16(n+0x90);
    print16(n+0xA0);
    print16(n+0xB0);
    print16(n+0xC0);
    print16(n+0xD0);
    print16(n+0xE0);
    print16(n+0xF0);
}

int print4096(int n)
{
    print256(n);
    print256(n+0x100);
    print256(n+0x200);
    print256(n+0x300);
    print256(n+0x400);
    print256(n+0x500);
    print256(n+0x600);
    print256(n+0x700);
    print256(n+0x800);
    print256(n+0x900);
    print256(n+0xA00);
    print256(n+0xB00);
    print256(n+0xC00);
    print256(n+0xD00);
    print256(n+0xE00);
    print256(n+0xF00);
}

int print65536(int n)
{
    print4096(n);
    print4096(n+0x1000);
    print4096(n+0x2000);
    print4096(n+0x3000);
    print4096(n+0x4000);
    print4096(n+0x5000);
    print4096(n+0x6000);
    print4096(n+0x7000);
    print4096(n+0x8000);
    print4096(n+0x9000);
    print4096(n+0xA000);
    print4096(n+0xB000);
    print4096(n+0xC000);
    print4096(n+0xD000);
    print4096(n+0xE000);
    print4096(n+0xF000);
}

int print1048576(int n)
{
    print65536(n);
    print65536(n+0x10000);
    print65536(n+0x20000);
    print65536(n+0x30000);
    print65536(n+0x40000);
    print65536(n+0x50000);
    print65536(n+0x60000);
    print65536(n+0x70000);
    print65536(n+0x80000);
    print65536(n+0x90000);
    print65536(n+0xA0000);
    print65536(n+0xB0000);
    print65536(n+0xC0000);
    print65536(n+0xD0000);
    print65536(n+0xE0000);
    print65536(n+0xF0000);
}

int print16777216(int n)
{
    print1048576(n);
    print1048576(n+0x100000);
    print1048576(n+0x200000);
    print1048576(n+0x300000);
    print1048576(n+0x400000);
    print1048576(n+0x500000);
    print1048576(n+0x600000);
    print1048576(n+0x700000);
    print1048576(n+0x800000);
    print1048576(n+0x900000);
    print1048576(n+0xA00000);
    print1048576(n+0xB00000);
    print1048576(n+0xC00000);
    print1048576(n+0xD00000);
    print1048576(n+0xE00000);
    print1048576(n+0xF00000);
}

int print268435456(int n)
{
    print16777216(n);
    print16777216(n+0x1000000);
    print16777216(n+0x2000000);
    print16777216(n+0x3000000);
    print16777216(n+0x4000000);
    print16777216(n+0x5000000);
    print16777216(n+0x6000000);
    print16777216(n+0x7000000);
    print16777216(n+0x8000000);
    print16777216(n+0x9000000);
    print16777216(n+0xA000000);
    print16777216(n+0xB000000);
    print16777216(n+0xC000000);
    print16777216(n+0xD000000);
    print16777216(n+0xE000000);
    print16777216(n+0xF000000);
}

int print2147483648(int n)
{
   /*
    * Only goes up to n+0x70000000 since we
    * deal only with postive 32 bit integers
    */
   print268435456(n);
   print268435456(n+0x10000000);
   print268435456(n+0x20000000);
   print268435456(n+0x30000000);
   print268435456(n+0x40000000);
   print268435456(n+0x50000000);
   print268435456(n+0x60000000);
   print268435456(n+0x70000000);
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   int i;

   if (argc > 1) {
      N = strtol(argv[1], NULL, 0);
   }

   if (N >=1) {
      printf("listing 1 to %d\n",N);
      print2147483648(0);
   }
   else {
      printf("Must enter a postive integer N\n");
   }
}
share|improve this answer

write all possible output to a string first, and null terminate it where the output should stop.
this is a rather dirty solution, but given the limitations, all I can think of,
except for using assembler, off course.

char a[]="1\n2\n3\n4\n5\n6\n7\n8\n9\n10\n11\n12\n13\n14\n15\n16\n17\n"/*...*/;
main(n,v)char**v;{n=atoi(v[1]);
#define c(x)(n>x?n-x:0)
a[n+c(1)+c(9)+c(99)+c(999)+c(9999)+c(99999)+c(999999)+c(9999999)/*+...*/]=0;
puts(a);}

Given that MAX_INT==2147483647 on popular architectures, we only need to go up to +c(999999999). Typing out that initial string might take a while, though...

share|improve this answer
1  
Code or it didn't happen! –  spoulson Oct 14 '09 at 11:16
    
There, I fixed it. –  ephemient Oct 14 '09 at 15:11

I'm very disappointed that this doesn't work. To me, the phrase "a function is called after any previously registered functions that had already been called at the time it was registered" suggests that it is possible to register atexit handlers after they have started to be called. That is, a handler can register another handler. Otherwise, how is it even possible for there to exist a function which has been called at the time another function is registered? But for me the call to atexit is returning 0 success, but not actually resulting in another call. Anyone know why, have I made some silly error?

#include "stdio.h"
#include "stdlib.h"

int count = 0;
int limit = 10;

void handler() {
    printf("%d of %d\n", ++count, limit);
    if (count < limit) atexit(handler);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    if (argc > 1) limit = atoi(argv[1]);
    atexit(handler);
}

By the way, not recursion because atexit doesn't call its parameter, it queues it to be called later. Obviously the C runtime contains a loop to call atexit handlers, but that loop exists whether you actually register any atexit handlers or not. So if this program contains a loop, so does every C program ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
see "Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied" section 6.6.1 Problems with atexit. –  Test Oct 14 '09 at 12:45
    
btw, my atexit proposal got vote -2, stop trying it –  Test Oct 14 '09 at 12:47
    
Thanks for that. Summary: the standard was inadequate, and didn't specify what should happen. The standard has been corrected. My compiler does not incorporate the correction, but if it did then this code would work. –  Steve Jessop Oct 14 '09 at 12:57
    
Maybe your code was voted down because it doesn't compile, rather than because it uses atexit. –  Steve Jessop Oct 14 '09 at 12:58
    
should i give the complete code? i'll just give ideas. –  Test Oct 14 '09 at 13:10

You can do this by nesting macros.

int i = 1;

#define PRINT_1(N) if( i < N ) printf("%d\n", i++ );
#define PRINT_2(N) PRINT_1(N) PRINT_1(N)
#define PRINT_3(N) PRINT_2(N) PRINT_2(N)
#define PRINT_4(N) PRINT_3(N) PRINT_3(N)
:
:
#define PRINT_32(N) PRINT_31(N) PRINT_31(N)

There will be 32 macros in total. Assuming size of int as 4 bytes. Now call PRINT_32(N) from any function.

Edit: Adding example for clarity.

void Foo( int n )
{
    i = 1;

    PRINT_32( n );
}


void main()
{
    Foo( 5 );
    Foo( 55 );
    Foo( 555 );
    Foo( 5555 );
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Just remove N from the macro parameters and you're good to go. I'm pretty sure that the resulting 4GB source file will kill the compiler, but theoretically it should work. –  itsadok Oct 14 '09 at 9:24
    
It'll be larger than 4GB, no? 2^32 * (28 bytes) = 120GB. –  Matt B. Oct 14 '09 at 17:12
    
Thanks all; I know this idea is not practical, but it is logical... I don't think there is a compiler that is having enough heap to compile this code. This might be a code supposed to be done by 2050 -:) –  Vadakkumpadath Oct 15 '09 at 4:22

This does it:

int main ()
{
printf ("1 to N one per each line\n");
return 0;
}

Here is another one:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main (int c, char ** v) {
    char b[100];
    sprintf (b, "perl -e 'map {print \"$_\\n\"} (1..%s)'", v[1]);
    system (b);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I have already posted this as a comment before you. Cheers.. -:) –  Vadakkumpadath Oct 14 '09 at 8:56
1  
Oh, I'm sorry but I didn't notice it. –  user181548 Oct 14 '09 at 8:58
3  
I detect a buffer overflow "feature". –  spoulson Oct 14 '09 at 11:17
#include <stdlib.h>

int callback(const void *a, const void *b) {
    static int n = 1;

    if (n <= N)
        printf("%d\n", n++);

    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv) {
    char *buf;
    /* get N value here */

    buf = malloc(N);  // could be less than N, but N is definitely sufficient
    qsort(buf, N, 1, callback);
}

I think it doesn't count as recursion.

share|improve this answer
1  
wow. that blew my mind. sneaky: use somebody else's loop... –  Daren Thomas Oct 14 '09 at 9:34
    
qsort use "for" or "while" internally, so your idea breaks the rule. –  Test Oct 14 '09 at 11:32
6  
@Effo, by your reasoning, any solution that uses printf() is also invalid since it undoubtedly used a loop of some sort to process the format string. That's going to make printing the line out pretty hard. –  paxdiablo Oct 14 '09 at 11:36
    
pretty hard? come on, what is a challenge? –  Test Oct 14 '09 at 12:27

I'd go for using longjmp()

#include <stdio.h>
#include <setjmp.h>

void do_loop(int n) {
  int val;
  jmp_buf env;

  val = 0;

  setjmp(env);

  printf("%d\n", ++val);

  if (val != n)
    longjmp(env, 0);  
}

int main() {
  do_loop(7);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice one, emulating a goto with setjmp/longjmp. Most whippersnappers don't even know those functions exist :-) +1. –  paxdiablo Oct 14 '09 at 11:40
    
This blew me off my feet. Awesome. –  darxsys Jul 22 '13 at 3:19

You can use setjmp and logjmp functions to do this as shown in this C FAQ

For those who are curious to why someone have a question like this, this is one of the frequently asked questions in India for recruiting fresh grads.

share|improve this answer
15  
So a standard recruiting question is "how do you do something mundane without using any methods that you should use, and instead doing it in an unnecessarily byzantine and complex way, for no reason at all?" Gee, how applicable. –  phoebus Oct 14 '09 at 8:48
1  
Yes, that is kind of a 'standard' recruiting question here. But most of the companies who ask such questions are not even actually recruiting them for a C programmer job, and in most cases, the person who is asking such a question has no real programming experience. –  Technowise Oct 14 '09 at 8:58
3  
mrduclaw: the term "syntactic sugar" implies that you could implement setjmp/longjmp using goto. You can't. setjmp/longjmp allow non-local jumps. –  Laurence Gonsalves Oct 14 '09 at 9:04
5  
Allowing setjmp/longjmp makes everything way too easy. Actually, I would forbid using any keyword or any ASCII character altogether. –  Daniel Daranas Oct 14 '09 at 9:20
3  
This explains how outsourcing to certain countries has gained such a poor reputation; because the code produced is rubbish. –  Rob Oct 14 '09 at 21:16

If you know the upper limit of N you can try something like this ;)

void func(int N)
{
	char *data = " 1\n 2\n 3\n 4\n 5\n 6\n 7\n 8\n 9\n10\n11\n12\n";
	if (N > 0 && N < 12)
		printf("%.*s", N*3, data);
	else
		printf("Not enough data. Need to reticulate some more splines\n");
}

Joke aside, I don't really see how you can do it without recursion or all the instructions you mentioned there. Which makes me more curious about the solution.

Edit: Just noticed I proposed the same solution as grombeestje :)

share|improve this answer

N is not fixed, so you can't unrole the loop. And C has no iterators as far as I know.

You should find something that mimics the loop.

Or thinking outside the box:

(for example N is limited to 1000, but it is easy to adapt)

int f(int N) {
    if (N >= 900) f100(100);
    if (N >= 800) f100(100);
    if (N >= 700) f100(100);
    ...

    f100(n % 100);
}

int f100(int N) {
    if (N >= 90) f10(10);
    if (N >= 80) f10(10);
    if (N >= 70) f10(10);
    ...

    f(n % 10);
}

int f10(int N) {
    if (N >= 9) func();
    if (N >= 8) func();
    if (N >= 7) func();
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Yhis seems the best solution to date, each new level of function gives you a tenfold space increase. This should get you to 2^63-1 pretty quickly. –  paxdiablo Oct 14 '09 at 8:37
3  
It's possible to wrap it in macros –  vava Oct 14 '09 at 8:42
2  
+1. All the other solutions use something in the standard libraries that is in some way goto-like or loop-like (longjmp, the signal queue, the atexit stack, the loop in qsort). This doesn't even make it to the libraries (except for the actual I/O code which needs to be added to complete the code), so as a solution it's robust to simple requirements changes. –  Steve Jessop Oct 14 '09 at 13:15
    
what will be complete code for this ? –  Arihant Nahata Aug 27 '11 at 15:16

You did not forbid fork().

share|improve this answer
6  
But that would almost certainly be considered recursion. –  paxdiablo Oct 14 '09 at 8:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.