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I am working on endianess. My little endian program works, and gives the correct output. But I am not able to get my way around big endian. Below is the what I have so far. I know i have to use bit shift and i dont think i am doing a good job at it. I tried asking my TA's and prof but they are not much help. I have been following this link (convert big endian to little endian in C [without using provided func]) to understand more but cannot still make it work. Thank you for the help.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    FILE* input;
    FILE* output;

    input = fopen(argv[1],"r");
    output = fopen(argv[2],"w");
    int value,value2;
    int i;
    int zipcode, population;
    while(fscanf(input,"%d %d\n",&zipcode, &population)!= EOF)
    {
        for(i = 0; i<4; i++)
        {
        population = ((population >> 4)|(population << 4));
        }
        fwrite(&population, sizeof(int), 1, output);
    }

    fclose(input);      
    fclose(output);

    return 0;
}   
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5  
ROFLMAO using bit what? (: –  Rubens Mar 27 '13 at 0:59
2  
Do you know what your word size ("bytes per integer") is? PS: "asking classmates is not allowed", but asking the Internet is? :) –  Kay Mar 27 '13 at 1:02
    
ill use the correct term. –  Mani Mar 27 '13 at 1:03
1  
Hm, doing bitshifts like those on signed integers is a bad idea... –  Matteo Italia Mar 27 '13 at 1:05
1  
Your program is nonsensical, as it reads two numbers in ASCII, then reverses the nibbles (not bytes, as would be the case for changing endianness) of one of them and writes it out in binary. You should specify exactly what problem you are trying to solve, what your input looks like, and what output is desired. –  Jim Balter Mar 27 '13 at 1:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'm answering not to give you the answer but to help you solve it yourself.

First ask yourself this: how many bits are in a byte? (hint: 8) Next, how many bytes are in an int? (hint: probably 4) Picture this 32-bit integer in memory:

  +--------+
0x|12345678|
  +--------+

Now picture it on a little-endian machine, byte-wise. It would look like this:

  +--+--+--+--+
0x|78|56|34|12|
  +--+--+--+--+

What shift operations are required to get the bytes into the correct spot?

Remember, when you use a bitwise operator like >>, you are operating on bits. So 1 << 24 would be the integer value 1 converted into the processor's opposite endianness.

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thank you. I think i get it. –  Mani Mar 27 '13 at 1:12

"little-endian" and "big-endian" refer to the order of bytes (we can assume 8 bits here) in a binary representation. When referring to machines, it's about the order of the bytes in memory: on big-endian machines, the address of an int will point to its highest-order byte, while on a little-endian machine the address of an int will refer to its lowest-order byte.

When referring to binary files (or pipes or transmission protocols etc.), however, it refers to the order of the bytes in the file: a "little-endian representation" will have the lowest-order byte first and the highest-order byte last.

How does one obtain the lowest-order byte of an int? That's the low 8 bits, so it's (n & 0xFF) (or ((n >> 0) & 0xFF), the usefulness of which you will see below).

The next lowest-order byte is ((n >> 8) & 0xFF). The next lowest-order byte is ((n >> 16) & 0xFF) ... or (((n >> 8) >> 8) & 0xFF). And so on.

So you can peal off bytes from n in a loop and output them one byte at a time ... you can use fwrite for that but it's simpler just to use putchar or putc.

You say that your teacher requires you to use fwrite. There are two ways to do that: 1) use fwrite(&n, 1, 1, filePtr) in a loop as described above. 2) Use the loop to reorder your int value by storing the bytes in the desired order in a char array rather than outputting them, then use fwrite to write it out. The latter is probably what your teacher has in mind.

Note that, if you just use fwrite to output your int it will work ... if you're running on a little-endian machine, where the bytes of the int are already stored in the right order. But the bytes will be backwards if running on a big-endian machine.

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thank you explaining it in detail. I get it now. Thank you –  Mani Mar 27 '13 at 1:39
    
@Mani Note that I made an edit with an important correction. If you reorder the bytes in memory and then use fwrite to output them all at once, you must store them in an array of chars ... the first byte of which will go out first. –  Jim Balter Mar 27 '13 at 1:53
    
How do you detect mixed-endian systems? –  undefined behaviour Mar 27 '13 at 2:05
    
@modifiablelvalue The endianness of the system isn't relevant here ... right-shifting bytes of an int gets the right bytes in the right order regardless of how the int is stored in memory. –  Jim Balter Mar 27 '13 at 2:12
    
@JimBalter Actually, this part of your answer makes "the endianness of the system" relevant here: "... When referring to machines, it's about the order of the bytes in memory: on big-endian machines, the address of an int will point to its highest-order byte, while on a little-endian machine the address of an int will refer to its lowest-order byte. ..." Now, back to my question... –  undefined behaviour Mar 27 '13 at 2:44

The problem with most answers to this question is portability. I've provided a portable answer here, but this recieved relatively little positive feedback. Note that C defines undefined behavior as: behavior, upon use of a nonportable or erroneous program construct or of erroneous data, for which this International Standard imposes no requirements.

The answer I'll give here won't assume that int is 16 bits in width; It'll give you an idea of how to represent "larger int" values. It's the same concept, but uses a dynamic loop rather than two fputcs.

Declare an array of sizeof int unsigned chars: unsigned char big_endian[sizeof int];

Separate the sign and the absolute value.

int sign = value < 0;
value = sign ? -value : value;

Loop from sizeof int to 0, writing the least significant bytes:

size_t foo = sizeof int;
do {
    big_endian[--foo] = value % (UCHAR_MAX + 1);
    value /= (UCHAR_MAX + 1);
} while (foo > 0);

Now insert the sign: foo[0] |= sign << (CHAR_BIT - 1);

Simple, yeh? Little endian is equally simple. Just reverse the order of the loop to go from 0 to sizeof int, instead of from sizeof int to 0:

size_t foo = 0;
do {
    big_endian[foo++] = value % (UCHAR_MAX + 1);
    value /= (UCHAR_MAX + 1);
} while (foo < sizeof int);

The portable methods make more sense, because they're well defined.

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"The problem with most answers to this question is portability." -- You actually have it backwards. The results of your code depends on the value of UCHAR_MAX and CHAR_BIT, but file formats are defined independently of the host machine, and almost invariably in terms of 8-bit bytes. The OP's teacher did not define exactly what file format is wanted, but it almost certainly isn't the big-endian host-specific sign-and-magnitude format your code produces. –  Jim Balter Mar 27 '13 at 2:44
    
Justify your comment: "Your program is nonsensical, as it reads two numbers in ASCII, then reverses the nibbles (not bytes, as would be the case for changing endianness) of one of them and writes it out in binary." –  undefined behaviour Mar 27 '13 at 2:59

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