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How can I use JUnit4 idiomatically to test that some code throws an exception?

While I can certainly do something like this:

@Test
public void testFooThrowsIndexOutOfBoundsException() {
  boolean thrown = false;

  try {
    foo.doStuff();
  } catch (IndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
    thrown = true;
  }

  assertTrue(thrown);
}

I recall that there is an annotation or an Assert.xyz or something that is far less kludgy and far more in-the-spirit of JUnit for these sorts of situations.

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5  
The problem with any other approach but this is that they invariably end the test once the exception has been thrown. I, on the other hand, often still want to call org.mockito.Mockito.verify with various parameters to make sure that certain things happened (such that a logger service was called with the correct parameters) before the exception was thrown. –  ZeroOne Jan 17 '13 at 11:05
3  
You can see how to exceptions test in JUnit wiki page github.com/junit-team/junit/wiki/Exception-testing –  PhoneixS Feb 19 at 11:46

12 Answers 12

up vote 479 down vote accepted

JUnit 4 has support for this:

@Test(expected=IndexOutOfBoundsException.class)
public void testIndexOutOfBoundsException() {
    ArrayList emptyList = new ArrayList();
    Object o = emptyList.get(0);
}
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3  
I discovered that that what i described before happened because the test wasn't marked with this annotation <code>@RunWith(value=BlockJUnit4ClassRunner.class)</code> –  raisercostin Dec 10 '09 at 15:08
4  
This piece of code will not work if you expect an exception only somewhere in your code, and not a blanket like this one. –  Oh Chin Boon Jun 27 '11 at 14:50
    
@skaffman This wouldn't work with org.junit.experimental.theories.Theory runned by org.junit.experimental.theories.Theories –  Artem Oboturov Apr 27 '12 at 16:01
    
@skaffman: Is there a way to do similar thing in junit 3.8, expect method to throw exception? –  Rachel Jun 8 '12 at 18:48
2  
@raisercostin: Please delete your first comment. With all the upvotes it is highly misleading (because the annotation works exactly as advertised, as you found out yourself in the next comment). –  Thilo Dec 4 '12 at 7:13

If you can use JUnit 4.7, you can use the ExpectedException Rule

public class FooTest {
  @Rule
  public ExpectedException exception = ExpectedException.none();

  @Test
  public void doStuffThrowsIndexOutOfBoundsException() {
    Foo foo = new Foo();

    exception.expect(IndexOutOfBoundsException.class);
    foo.doStuff();
  }
}

This is better than @Test(expected=IndexOutOfBoundsException.class) because the test will fail if IndexOutOfBoundsException is thrown before foo.doStuff()

See this article for details

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60  
+1 a better solution than the accepted answer. –  Oh Chin Boon Jun 27 '11 at 14:51
10  
@skaffman - If I've understood this correctly, it looks like the exception.expect is being applied only within one test, not the whole class. –  bacar Jul 6 '12 at 11:41
1  
If the exception we expect to be thrown is an checked exception, should we add throws or try-catch or test this situation in another way? –  MJafar Mash Jun 29 '13 at 8:05
    
IMHO the answer from rwoo below is a much better solution (code.google.com/p/catch-exception) i.e. in this example when you throw new NullPointerException(); after foo.doStuff() the test will not fail with an NPE. –  Martin Trummer Sep 27 '13 at 14:35
    
@MartinTrummer No code should run after foo.doStuff() since the exception is thrown and the method is exited. Having code after an expected exception (with the exception of closing resources in a finally) is unhelpful anyway since it should never be executed if the exception is thrown. –  Jason Thompson Jan 17 at 15:59

Be careful using expected exception, because it only asserts that the method threw that exception, not a particular line of code in the test.

I tend to use this for testing parameter validation, because such methods are usually very simple, but more complex tests might better be served with:

try {
    methodThatShouldThrow();
    fail( "My method didn't throw when I expected it to" );
} catch (MyException expectedException) {
}

Apply judgement.

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27  
Maybe I'm old school but I still prefer this. It also gives me a place to test the exception itself: sometimes I have exceptions with getters for certain values, or I might simply look for a particular value in the message (e.g. looking for "xyz" in the message "unrecognized code 'xyz'"). –  Rodney Gitzel Oct 6 '10 at 17:22
    
I think NamshubWriter's approach gives you the best of both worlds. –  Eddie Mar 9 '11 at 19:21
    
+1 useful in some scenarios where expected = xx doesn't match requirements. –  Oh Chin Boon Jun 27 '11 at 15:20
3  
Using ExpectedException you could call N exception.expect per method to test like this exception.expect(IndexOutOfBoundsException.class); foo.doStuff1(); exception.expect(IndexOutOfBoundsException.class); foo.doStuff2(); exception.expect(IndexOutOfBoundsException.class); foo.doStuff3(); –  user1154664 Oct 9 '12 at 17:07
3  
@user1154664 Actually, you can't. Using ExpectedException you can only test that one method throws an exception, because when that method is called, the test will stop executing because it threw the expected exception! –  NamshubWriter Feb 24 at 16:26

To solve the same problem I did set up a small project: http://code.google.com/p/catch-exception/

Using this little helper you would write

verifyException(foo, IndexOutOfBoundsException.class).doStuff();

This is less verbose than the ExpectedException rule of JUnit 4.7. In comparison to the solution provided by skaffman, you can specify in which line of code you expect the exception. I hope this helps.

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I thought about doing something like this as well, but ultimately discovered that the true power of ExpectedException is that not only can you specify the expected exception, but you can also specify certain properties of the exception such as the expected cause or expected message. –  Jason Thompson Jan 17 at 16:28
    
you can also do this with caughtException –  Martin Trummer Jan 20 at 9:36
    
My guess is that this solution has some of the same drawbacks as mocks? For example, if foo is final it will fail because you can't proxy foo? –  Tom Jun 20 at 19:39

How about this: Catch a very general exception, make sure it makes it out of the catch block, then assert that the class of the exception is what you expect it to be. This assert will fail if a) the exception is of the wrong type (eg. if you got a Null Pointer instead) and b) the exception wasn't ever thrown.

public void testFooThrowsIndexOutOfBoundsException() {
  Throwable e = null;

  try {
    foo.doStuff();
  } catch (Throwable ex) {
    e = ex;
  }

  assertTrue(e instanceof IndexOutOfBoundsException);
}
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2  
That's what you do in JUnit 3. Junit 4 does it better. –  skaffman Oct 1 '08 at 7:24
1  
Also, you won't see what kind of Exception ex is in the test results when the day comes where the test fails. –  jontejj Mar 14 '13 at 16:13

BDD Style Solution: JUnit 4 + Catch Exception

@Test
public void testFooThrowsIndexOutOfBoundsException() {

    when(foo).doStuff();

    then(caughtException()).isInstanceOf(IndexOutOfBoundsException.class);

}

Source code

Dependencies

com.googlecode.catch-exception:catch-exception:1.2.0
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JUnit has built-in support for this, with an "expected" attribute

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As answered before, there are many ways of dealing with exceptions in JUnit. But with Java 8 there is another one: using Lambda Expressions. With Lambda Expressions we can achieve a syntax like this:

@Test
public void verifiesTypeAndMessage() {
    assertThrown(new DummyService()::someMethod)
            .isInstanceOf(RuntimeException.class)
            .hasMessage("Runtime exception occurred")
            .hasMessageStartingWith("Runtime")
            .hasMessageEndingWith("occurred")
            .hasMessageContaining("exception")
            .hasNoCause();
}

assertThrown accepts a functional interface, which instances can be created with lambda expressions, method references, or constructor references. assertThrown accepting that interface will expect and be ready to handle an exception.

This is relatively simple yet powerful technique.

Have a look at this blog post describing this technique: http://blog.codeleak.pl/2014/07/junit-testing-exception-with-java-8-and-lambda-expressions.html

The source code can be found here: https://github.com/kolorobot/unit-testing-demo/tree/master/src/test/java/com/github/kolorobot/exceptions/java8

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You can also do this:

@Test
public void testFooThrowsIndexOutOfBoundsException() {
    try {
        foo.doStuff();
        assert false;
    } catch (IndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
        assert true;
    }
}
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14  
Whats up with the weird bracket style? –  Mike Rylander Nov 1 '13 at 17:55

I tried many of the methods here, but they were either complicated or didn't quite meet my requirements. In fact, one can write a helper method quite simply:

public class ExceptionAssertions {
    public static void assertException(BlastContainer blastContainer ) {
        boolean caughtException = false;
        try {
            blastContainer.test();
        } catch( Exception e ) {
            caughtException = true;
        }
        if( !caughtException ) {
            throw new AssertionFailedError("exception expected to be thrown, but was not");
        }
    }
    public static interface BlastContainer {
        public void test() throws Exception;
    }
}

Use it like this:

assertException(new BlastContainer() {
    @Override
    public void test() throws Exception {
        doSomethingThatShouldExceptHere();
    }
});

Zero dependencies: no need for mockito, no need powermock; and works just fine with final classes.

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Interesting, but doesn't fit to AAA (Arrange Act Assert), where you want to do the Act and the Assert step in actually different steps. –  bln-tom Oct 28 at 21:15

In my case I always get RuntimeException from db, but messages differ. And exception need to be handled respectively. Here is how I tested it:

@Test
public void testThrowsExceptionWhenWrongSku() {

    // Given
    String articleSimpleSku = "999-999";
    int amountOfTransactions = 1;
    Exception exception = null;

    // When
    try {
        createNInboundTransactionsForSku(amountOfTransactions, articleSimpleSku);
    } catch (RuntimeException e) {
        exception = e;
    }

    // Then
    shouldValidateThrowsExceptionWithMessage(exception, MESSAGE_NON_EXISTENT_SKU);
}

private void shouldValidateThrowsExceptionWithMessage(final Exception e, final String message) {
    assertNotNull(e);
    assertTrue(e.getMessage().contains(message));
}
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Just make a Matcher that can be turned off and on, like this:

public class ExceptionMatcher extends BaseMatcher<Throwable> {
private boolean active = true;
private Class<? extends Throwable> throwable;

public ExceptionMatcher(Class<? extends Throwable> throwable) {
    this.throwable = throwable;
}

public void on() {
    this.active = true;
}

public void off() {
    this.active = false;
}

@Override
public boolean matches(Object object) {
    return active && throwable.isAssignableFrom(object.getClass());
}

@Override
public void describeTo(Description description) {
    description.appendText("not the covered exception type");
}
}

To use it:

add the public field ExpectedException exception = ExpectedException.none(); then in your code

ExceptionMatcher exMatch = new ExceptionMatcher(MyException.class);
exception.expect(exMatch);
someObject.somethingThatThrowsMyException();
exMatch.off();
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