Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm learning python and I was just wondering if I there was a way to write a code that does something like:

def f(x):
    if x>1:
       return(x)
    else:
        # don't return anything

I'm asking about the else part of the code. I need to not return anything if x<=1, returning None isn't acceptable.

share|improve this question
1  
what would the calling code look like? – cppguy Mar 27 '13 at 1:46
    
why dont you just return null? – d.moncada Mar 27 '13 at 1:47
3  
When you just leave the function it is returning None, only way to avoid it is to throw exception or have non-terminating function. – zch Mar 27 '13 at 1:48
1  
Why is returning None unacceptable? You can ignore the return value of a function. – Russell Borogove Mar 27 '13 at 1:50
3  
@Kirca: You haven't said why None is unacceptable, but it's probably due to a misconception. There's no way to end a function without either returning a value or raising an exception. – Ned Batchelder Mar 27 '13 at 1:52
up vote 12 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as "returning nothing" in Python. Every function returns some value (unless it raises an exception). If no explicit return statement is used, Python treats it as returning None.

So, you need to think about what is most appropriate for your function. Either you should return None (or some other sentinel value) and add appropriate logic to your calling code to detect this, or you should raise an exception (which the calling code can catch, if it wants to).

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Although, could technically just "not return" (instead of return None) and it would be just as valid .. although it would offend my sensibilities. – user166390 Mar 27 '13 at 1:54

You can do something like this:

>>> def f(x):
...    return x if x>1 else None
... 
>>> f(1),f(2)
(None, 2)

It will appear to 'return nothing':

>>> f(1)
>>> 

But even the alternative returns None:

>>> def f2(x): 
...    if x>1: return x
... 
>>> f2(1),f2(2)
(None, 2)

Or:

>>> def f2(x):
...    if x>1: 
...        return x
...    else:
...        pass
... 
>>> f2(1),f2(2)
(None, 2)

So they are functionally the same no matter how you write it.

share|improve this answer

To literally return 'nothing' use pass, which basically returns the value None if put in a function(Functions must return a value, so why not 'nothing'). You can do this explicitly and return None yourself though.

So either:

if x>1:
    return(x)
else:
    pass

or

if x>1:
    return(x)
else:
    return None

will do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
Op said returning None is not an acceptable option. – snapshoe Mar 27 '13 at 1:51
    
Both of those examples are identical to having no else block at all. – Blckknght Mar 27 '13 at 1:52
    
Indeed, but why not have it there, for the sake of completeness. – Quirliom Mar 27 '13 at 1:53
    
"OP said returning None is not acceptable" True, but that makes no sense, and OP hasn't explained what he meant. – Ned Batchelder Mar 27 '13 at 2:22

Would this work for you ?

if x>1:

    return(x)

else:

    pass
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 This will still return None, if it's in a function. – snapshoe Mar 27 '13 at 1:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.