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This code was working a few minutes ago and after I restarted my ghci, it stopped working.. Now I'm getting random errors on either where, snst or size. (not sure what I've changed to cause each separate error)

Can someone point out what's wrong with my syntax?

instance Array Tree where
    new n x  
        | n <= 0    = Leaf
        | odd n     = Node n nst x nst
        | even n    = Node n (Node (n `div` 2) snst x snst) x snst
        where nst = (new (n `div` 2) x)
              snst = (new (n `div` 2 - 1) x)

    size Leaf            = 0
    size (Node s _ _ _)  = s
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As always in these cases, make sure that there are no tabs hiding.

I checked that your way to indent where is valid. So unless there is an error before the instance declaration I can't see any syntactical errors.

Also, one idea to eliminate sources of errors would be to move out the definition of new.

myNew :: ...
myNew n x  
        | n <= 0    = Leaf
        | odd n     = Node n nst x nst
        | even n    = Node n (Node (n `div` 2) snst x snst) x snst
        where nst = (new (n `div` 2) x)
              snst = (new (n `div` 2 - 1) x)

instance Array Tree where
    new = myNew

    size Leaf            = 0
    size (Node s _ _ _)  = s

Try this and see if that compiles

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That work's just fine. Thanks. But is there any explanation as to why the way I did it caused compilation to fail? –  user1043625 Mar 27 '13 at 3:07
    
@user1043625 Well. The syntax for function definitions within instances is limited. As far as I remembered, you were only allowed to have one equation per function. But obviously you have 2 for size here. So I'm confused by this as well. –  Tarrasch Mar 27 '13 at 4:23
6  
@Tarrasch: that's incorrect. There is no such limitation for function definitions within instance declarations. –  dblhelix Mar 27 '13 at 6:33
    
@dblhelix Really? Thanks for pointing this out! :) –  Tarrasch Mar 27 '13 at 11:52
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