Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For some reason, when I run this code, I get a seg fault when the value of i in the for-loop is 7654319. However the strange thing is that when I am not checking if the value is pan-digital, it works normally without a segfault. It also works when I am checking if it is just pandigital; but not for both. I used gdb to step through the code and here is the output I get:

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x00000000004007d3 in main () at Pand.cc:81
81      if (isPandigital(i) && Primes[i])
6: Primes[i] = <error: Cannot access memory at address 0x7ffefffffff4>
5: i = <error: Cannot access memory at address 0x7ffefffffff4>
4: Primes[7654317] = <error: Cannot access memory at address 0x7ffefffffff8>
3: Primes[7654321] = <error: Cannot access memory at address 0x7ffefffffff8>
2: Primes[7654319] = <error: Cannot access memory at address 0x7ffefffffff8>
1: Primes = <error: Cannot access memory at address 0x7ffefffffff8>

From the output, it seems that by manipulating the value of i in the isPandigital(int) function, this also affects value of i in main. This didn't make any sense to me, but I went ahead and used a different variable to represent i in the isPandigital(int) function, but I still get the same error.

Can someone help me please? These kind of errors are so annoying because everything seems like it should be working, but it's not and the solution is just hiding itself under layers of implementation. Any help is appreciated!

#include <cstdio>
#define MAX 7700000

typedef unsigned int uint;

bool* GetPrimes()
{  
  const int Need = MAX;
  bool* Sieve = new bool[Need];

  for (int s = 0; s < Need; ++s)
    Sieve[s] = 1;

  bool Done = false;
  uint w = 3;

  while (!Done)
  {  
    for (uint q = 3, Prod = w * q; Prod < (uint)Need ; q += 2, Prod = w * q)
      Sieve[Prod] = false;

    Done = (w > (Need >> 1) ? true : false);

    w+=2;
  }
  return Sieve;
}

bool isPandigital(int num)
{
  int arr [] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7}, G, count = 7;
  do
  {
    G = num%10;
    if (arr[G-1])
      --count;
    arr[G-1] = 0;
  } while (num/=10);

  return (!count);
}

int main()
{  
  bool* Prime = GetPrimes();
  int i;

  for (i = 7654321 ;i > 2; i-=2)
  {
    if (Prime[i] && isPandigital(i))
      break;
  }

  printf("%d\n", i); 

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Rapptz, talonmies, default locale, Jeremy, Trott Mar 27 '13 at 5:02

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Have you considered debugging? –  Rapptz Mar 27 '13 at 4:09
    
although it is irrelevant to your segfault, you should notice that you don't free the memory when done with it. –  Jakob Weisblat Mar 27 '13 at 4:18
    
also, are you working on projecteuler.net/problem=41 by any chance? :) –  Jakob Weisblat Mar 27 '13 at 4:18
    
Yes I have considered this, which is why I used gdb to step through it and was able to find out which number was causing the error - This is basically the next number after the first one in the for-loop - 7654319 And yes Jake223 that is what I am working on –  Smac89 Mar 27 '13 at 4:19
    
Jake223, considering your free memory comment. I have tried doing this before, but the compiler gave a warning that this is done automatically; so I just left it as is –  Smac89 Mar 27 '13 at 4:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your isPandigital function. Notice that if num is a multiple of ten or congruent to 8 or 9 mod 10, you'll have a few problems. Out-of-bounds array accesses often lead to segfaults.

The first prime for which this occurs is 19 (or 7654319 if you go backwards from 7654321):

bool isPandigital(int num)//num is (76543)19
{
  int arr [] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7}, G, count = 7;
  do
  {
    G = num%10;        //G is 9
    if (arr[G-1])      //G-1 is 8; G is only indexed from 0 to 6.
      --count;            
    arr[G-1] = 0;      //G-1 is 8; G is only indexed from 0 to 6.
  } while (num/=10);

  return (!count);
}

Note that though the solution will not have an 8 or 9 in it, any prime you test might.

share|improve this answer
    
G = num%10; will actually be 9 for num = 19. –  Jefffrey Mar 27 '13 at 4:18
1  
Thank you - that was dumb. –  Jakob Weisblat Mar 27 '13 at 4:18
    
OMG dude, you are legend! I will try fixing that right away! –  Smac89 Mar 27 '13 at 4:23
1  
Thanks - it always helps to get an extra set of eyes on your code :) –  Jakob Weisblat Mar 27 '13 at 4:24
    
Yes! it works now! –  Smac89 Mar 27 '13 at 4:26

Look at:

 G = num%10;
    if (arr[G-1])

So, what if G is zero? This would also trash your stack, making debug hard.

On the face of it, isPandigital works nicely in the case when the number passed is pan-digital, else has an array bound under/overrun?

share|improve this answer
    
Inside the for loop it will never be because num is always going to be an odd number. –  Jefffrey Mar 27 '13 at 4:12
    
Well, I'd be making a check/assert on that assumption. –  Keith Mar 27 '13 at 4:14
    
Still it is not the cause of segfault. –  Jefffrey Mar 27 '13 at 4:15
    
I don't believe that is the problem. I have used the function to find all pandigitals from 123456789 to 123987654 and I never got a seg fault doing that. It is something else less obvious I tried doing this if (G){ if (arr[G-1])} And I still get the error –  Smac89 Mar 27 '13 at 4:16
1  
What about 7654109, which is prime? –  Keith Mar 27 '13 at 4:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.