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Ok, so I'm kind of new to the jQuery plugin game and I've done a lot of reading and it just seems like there's 27 million ways to write a jQuery plugin. What I want to do in my plug in is use the cleanest way to handle events.

Take for example this base plugin pattern:

;(function ( $, window, document, undefined ) {

    var pluginName = 'MyPlugin';
    var defaults = {
            propertyName: "value"
    };

    function Plugin( element, options ) {
            this.options = $.extend( {}, defaults, options );
            this._defaults = defaults;
            this._name = pluginName;
            this.element = element;
            this.init();
    }

    Plugin.prototype = {
            init: function() {
                    // SOME INIT FUNCTION
            },
            someMethod: function(el, options) {
                    // DO SOMETHING ELSE
            }
    }

    $.fn[pluginName] = function(options) {
            return this.each(function() {
                    if (!$.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName)) {
                            $.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName, new Plugin(this, options));
                    }
                    else if ($.isFunction(Plugin.prototype[options])) {
                            $.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName)[options]();
                    }
            });
    }

})( jQuery, window, document );

Then we have this simple html:

<a href="a link to somewhere">My Link</a>

Let's say in our plugin we wanted to alert the href when the link is clicked and prevent the default action. Obviously this is a really dumbed down example and what I'm wanting to do is way more intense, so please don't say 'you don't need a plugin for that,' as that's not the point here.

So we init our plugin on our links:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('a').each(function(){
        $(this).MyPlugin();
    });
});

I don't know if there's a way to add a click: method and just have it called automatically. Or maybe there's some sort of inner event binding?

share|improve this question
    
It looks like (from the way the plugin boilerplate is written) that you could just type $('a').MyPlugin() to bind it to all a elements. –  Jason Sperske Mar 27 '13 at 5:51
    
Ok, but that doesn't answer the events question –  Tomas Mar 27 '13 at 6:13

2 Answers 2

I would just add a click event on the init function, so it's cleaner

Plugin.prototype = {
    init: function() {
        // DO INIT

        $(this.element).on("click", function(e){
            e.preventDefault();
            alert($(this).attr("href"));
        });
    },
    someMethod: function(el, options) {
        // DO SOMETHING ELSE
    }
};

Or,

You could just put it on a separate method: http://jsfiddle.net/nashio/PDyEd/4/

;(function ( $, window, document, undefined ) {

    var pluginName = 'MyPlugin';
    var defaults = {
        propertyName: "value"
    };

    function Plugin( element, options ) {
        this.options = $.extend( {}, defaults, options );
        this._defaults = defaults;
        this._name = pluginName;
        this.element = element;
        this.init();
        this.attachEvents(this.element, this.options);
    }

    Plugin.prototype = {
        init: function() {
            // DO INIT
        },
        attachEvents: function(el, options) {
           $(el).on("click", function(e){
                e.preventDefault();
                alert($(this).attr("href"));
            });
        }
    };

    $.fn[pluginName] = function(options) {
        return this.each(function() {


            if (!$.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName)) {
                $.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName, new Plugin(this, options));
            }
            else if ($.isFunction(Plugin.prototype[options])) {
                $.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName)[options]();
            }
        });
    }

})( jQuery, window, document );

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('a').MyPlugin(); 
});
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to find out if there is a way to pull this out of the init function. I guess a person could put the click handler in the init and send it on to a click method... doesn't sound like that's the way it should be though. –  Tomas Mar 27 '13 at 12:58
    
Well, the init is being executed when you create the object, so that's why I would put it there, but if you want to take it out, you could just put it on a method maybe called "attachEvents" and then execute it on instantiation. –  Ignacio Mar 27 '13 at 18:30
    
I'd choose this as the right answer, but I don't think the event attachment should come in the main Plugin function. What I ended up doing was creating a method, let's call it alertHref in this case. See the example fiddle here: jsfiddle.net/kjVhE –  Tomas Mar 28 '13 at 15:39
    
I honestly don't see any major diference, just the fact that the executing method "alert" is it's own method. –  Ignacio Mar 29 '13 at 3:53

Edit 2: I was right the first time, heh. I haven't used this pattern before, but I like it.

So in your plugin prototype method, you have access to the elements in the each loop, so you can bind a click there, or whatever else you'd like!

$.fn[pluginName] = function(options) {
    return this.each(function() {
        $(this).click(function(event) {
            event.preventDefault();
            alert($(this).attr('href'));
        });

        if (!$.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName)) {
            $.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName, new Plugin(this, options));
        }
        else if ($.isFunction(Plugin.prototype[options])) {
            $.data(this, 'plugin_' + pluginName)[options]();
        }
    });
}

Also, there was a missing { in your code on the function Plugin line.

See it working in this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/PDyEd/

share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe that's a good spot to put that code. In this setup that code block is primarily used for ensuring there's not multiple copies of the plugin. –  Tomas Mar 27 '13 at 12:51
    
Yeah... I actually agree with Ignacio after looking at it again. –  CWSpear Mar 27 '13 at 17:29

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