Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to setup a model based on a pre-built model that has the following code in the migration:

   def change
      create_table :friendships do |t|
         t.string :user_id, :friend_user_id
         t.string :status
       end
  end

I get the t.string :status part where a column is being created which will use a string. I don't understand the t.string :user_id, :friend_user_id part where there are two attributes on the same line.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the first line, two columns are being created named as user_id and friend_user_id having string data type. In the second line there is another column being created named status having string data type. So in migrations you can write all column names in one line which have the same data type. i.e. The migration can be written like this.

def change
  create_table :friendships do |t|
    t.string :user_id, :friend_user_id, :status
  end
end
share|improve this answer

This is a join table to show relationship. Actually user_id and friend_user_id all refer to id in users table.

Say my id is 10 and yours is 11. I regard you as a "good" friend. So in this table there is a record: 10, 11, "good". But you think me as a normal friend, so one more record: 11, 10, "normal"

share|improve this answer

This is simply a declaration of two columns with similar attributes in the same line. It is similar to

t.string :user_id
t.string :friend_user_id

You can find the documentation for that in here (look for "Short-hand examples")

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.