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void function() {
    try
    {
        // do something

        foreach (item in itemList)
        {
            try 
            {
                //do something
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new Exception("functionB: " + ex.Message);
            }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        LogTransaction(ex.Message);
    }
}

Hi, I would like to throw the exception from the for loop to its parent. Currently when there is an exception in the for loop, the loop will be terminated. Is there anyway to modify it so that the exception will be thrown but the loop will continue?

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I think you might want to look at Async Events. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228974.aspx and msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/e7a34yad.aspx –  Adriaan Stander Mar 27 '13 at 7:11
2  
Can you clarify expected behavior? I don't get want throw exception AND continue the loop means. Do you want to postpone all exception till loop completion? Or let parent continue iteration from the next item ? something else? –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 27 '13 at 7:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

No, you can`t throw an exception from the loop and continue to iterate throught it. However you can save your exception in the array and handle them after the loop. Like this:

List<Exception> loopExceptions = new List<Exception>();
foreach (var item in itemList)
  try 
  {
    //do something
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    loopExceptions.Add(ex);
  }

foreach (var ex in loopExceptions)
  //handle them
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, this is exactly what i am looking for. –  noobie Mar 27 '13 at 7:19
5  
Throwing them all at once using AggregateException would probably be a good way to handle them. –  Thorarin Mar 27 '13 at 7:25
    
Probably, but it is just a matter of choise - he would still have to iterate through all the inner exceptions. –  JleruOHeP Mar 27 '13 at 7:28
    
+1 for handling them all after the loop. –  Cornelius Mar 27 '13 at 8:04

You have to build a try-catch-block inside your loop and don't throw the exception again.

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I need the outer try-catch-block as there are chance for exception to occur in the outer part, and also need to throw the exception as I need to log the process. –  noobie Mar 27 '13 at 7:14

How about this?

void function() {
    var IsCompleted = false;
    try
    {
        // do something

        foreach (item in itemList)
        {
            try 
            {
                //do something
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new Exception("functionB: " + ex.Message);
            }
            var IsCompleted = true;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        LogTransaction(ex.Message);
    }

    If (!IsCompleted)
       function();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
this is also an alternative, but in this case the for loop will have to restart from the beginning, thanks anyway –  noobie Mar 27 '13 at 7:27

The throw syntax is designed implicitly to interrupt execution, and 'bubble up' the stack to the nearest caller with a catch syntax.

There's not a way to resume execution of the loop once the exception is caught, as there is in (say) Classic ASP or VB Script.

The point is that exceptions are supposed to be rare. They should not be used as a method of controlling application flow.

If your intent is that you want to allow something else to handle errors, you should instead structure your code so that you can pass in an error handler.

One example of this is:

void Process(IEnumerable<object> data, Action<object, Exception> handleError) 
{

    foreach(var o in data) 
    { 
        try 
        { 
            // do something
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            handleError(o, ex); 
        }
    }
}

Calling like so:

Process(data, (obj, ex) => RequeueForProcessingDueToError(obj.Id, ex.Message)); 

This allows you to pass in a delegate that handles the error functionality. You could pass in a delegate in many ways: Events, for instance being another.

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