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When using a Controller, is it advisable to expose your domain entity or is it better to create a model. I have this as an example:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(Order order)
{
        if (SaveObject<Order>(order, false))
        {
                return RedirectToAction("Index", new { id = order.CustomerNo });
        }
        else
        {
                ViewData.Model = order;
                return View();
        }
}

If it's better to expose a model what should be contained in it? Do I need to create backing properties, or maybe only the fields I need to expose for my current use case? I came across the term "Model Injection", can someone explain what the implications are for using it is and how it can be done?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

When using a Controller, is it advisable to expose your domain entity

No, it is not advisable.

or is it better to create an OrderViewModel.

Yes, it is better.

If yes, what should be contained in my view model?

The properties that you want to be exposed and modified by the user.

I came across the term "Model Injection", can someone explain what the implications of this is and how it can be done?

Imagine the following domain model:

public class User
{
    public bool IsAdministrator { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
}

and you want to have a controller action that would allow the user to change his first name. So you go with:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(User user)
{
    Save(user);
    ...
}

and a corresponding view in which you would have a textfield for the first name. The user could now very easily simulate a request to your controller action and set (inject) the IsAdministrator property to true.

That's why you should use a view model:

public class ChangeFirstNameUserModel
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
}

and then:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Create(ChangeFirstNameUserModel model)
{
    ...
}
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It is always best to create a mapped model of your entity. Especially if you do not plan to modify each of the property of your entity. And also, if your entity has child objects and you did not eager load them, if you're using an ORM (e.g. EF, NHibernate) then you have the risk of having select n+1 issue. Your model should also contain only the properties that you would want to update so you won't have over-posting.

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