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How to print the elements of a hash that is defined in another file?

file1.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
our %hash = 
("Quarter" , 25,
 "Dime"    , 10,
 "Nickel"  , 5 );

file2.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
require "file1.pl"
foreach (sort keys %hash){
print "$hash{$_}\n";
}

Output:

Global symbol "%hash" requires explicit package name.
Global symbol "%hash" requires explicit package name.

Kindly help

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marked as duplicate by ikegami, amon, Frank Shearar, Peter DeWeese, Anand Mar 27 '13 at 13:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
For future reference, select your code, then press Ctrl-K or the appropriate button in the toolbar to make your code look right. –  ikegami Mar 27 '13 at 7:30
    
(Ignore my vote to close. The post I mentioned in the close vote has inserted a bug in their answer since yesterday.) –  ikegami Mar 27 '13 at 7:37
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/4543934/… this question looks similar to what you need. –  daa Mar 27 '13 at 8:28
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Modules need a package statement and must end with a true value. (It currently returns a true value, but I like to use an explicit 1;.) It's better to give them the .pm extension.

# MyConfig.pm
package MyConfig;
use strict;
use warnings;
our %hash = (
   "Quarter" => 25,
   "Dime"    => 10,
   "Nickel"  =>  5,
);
1;

Now, if you left it at that, you'd need to use %MyConfig::hash instead of %hash. So we need to export the var from the module to the user's namespace.

# MyConfig.pm
package MyConfig;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Exporter qw( import );
our @EXPORT = qw( %hash );
our %hash = (
   "Quarter" => 25,
   "Dime"    => 10,
   "Nickel"  =>  5,
);
1;

So on to the script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use MyConfig;
for (sort keys %hash) {
   print "$hash{$_}\n";
}

use MyConfig; does a require (if necessary) and an import. The latter brings the variables and subs listed in @EXPORT into the current namespace.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! That will be of great help! –  Vinod R M Mar 27 '13 at 7:58
    
The reason you want to use a proper module is so can do use MyConfig; from multiple places in your application without problem. It might not be needed in this particular project, but doing do 'helper.pl' or die $@; is a bad habit to get into even if it's a couple of lines shorter. TLP's suggestion to use an actual config file format for a config file is a very good idea, though. –  ikegami Mar 27 '13 at 8:04
    
I get your point. I got one more doubt. Now If I have to declare a package, Is it necessary that the file be a .pm file? Or any other file format would do? –  Vinod R M Mar 27 '13 at 8:06
    
@VinodRM File format? Did you mean "File extension"? Yes, it does matter if you use the use keyword. –  TLP Mar 27 '13 at 8:10
    
Well, if you changed the extension (e.g. to .pl), you'd have to change use MyConfig; to BEGIN { require "MyConfig.pl"; import MyConfig; } –  ikegami Mar 27 '13 at 8:42
show 6 more comments

Ignoring the fact that the code you posted was many edits away from actually giving the error messages you claimed, your problem is that you do not declare %hash in file2.pl. Since that file uses the strict pragma (which is a good thing), it gives this fatal error. To overcome this, declare the hash:

our %hash;
require 'file1.pl';
#... etc.

However, if you are trying to use require as a means of loading a configuration file, there are many better ways. For example Config::Any.

share|improve this answer
    
@TLP If I declare a hash in file2.pl say, our %hash; how does it get access to the hash defined in file1.pl? –  Vinod R M Mar 27 '13 at 7:52
    
@VinodRM They both refer to the same variable, %main::hash. If you declared a package, e.g. package MyConfig like in ikegami's answer, you could use %MyConfig::hash in file1.pl. Which is the explicit package name that the original error message mentioned. –  TLP Mar 27 '13 at 8:08
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