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I have data like these:

a{b}cde
a{b}c{d}e

I want to spilt the string into three parts:

  1. string before first {} pair
  2. string in first {} pair
  3. rest

here is my code:

if(/(.*){(.*)}(.*)/){
    print "$1\t$2\t$3\n";  # ===> a{b}c   d       e
}

but it's not work for a{b}c{d}e

I want a b c{d}e instead of a{b}c d e

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So by "first pair" you mean the "last pair"? –  William Pursell Mar 27 '13 at 7:36
    
no, the first : his example show a (before first pair) and b (inside first pair) and c{d}e (after first pair) –  Olivier Dulac Mar 27 '13 at 12:27
    
You should really escape the bare { and }. Use either \{ or [{]. –  Brad Gilbert Mar 29 '13 at 21:47
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Making .* non-greedy (.*?) will do the trick:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    if($line =~ m/(.*?){(.*?)}(.*)/){
    print "$1\t$2\t$3\n";
    }
}

__DATA__
a{b}cde
a{b}c{d}e
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While non-greedy matches work in this case, I would advocate instead using a negated character class. This states more explicitly that you want a series of non-} characters, rather than the shortest possible sequence of any character at all which is followed by a }.

#!/usr/bin/env perl    

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

while (<DATA>) {
  say "$1\t$2\t$3" if /^([^{]*){([^}]*)}(.*)/;
} 

__DATA__
a{b}cde
a{b}c{d}e
share|improve this answer
    
Dave, is the negated character class faster? –  Mauritz Hansen Mar 27 '13 at 8:33
    
@MauritzHansen: In principle, it can be because it seriously reduces (or, in this case, completely eliminates) the possibility that the regex engine might need to backtrack in order to find the correct match. In practice, the Perl regex engine is optimized pretty heavily, so I don't think there should be a noticeable performance difference in non-pathological cases. –  Dave Sherohman Mar 27 '13 at 10:22
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