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The following code works:

class Foo(tuple):

    def __init__(self, b):
        super(Foo, self).__init__(tuple(b))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print Foo([3, 4])

$ python play.py 
play.py:4: DeprecationWarning: object.__init__() takes no parameters
  super(Foo, self).__init__(tuple(b))
(3, 4)

But not the following:

class Foo(tuple):

    def __init__(self, a, b):
        super(Foo, self).__init__(tuple(b))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print Foo(None, [3, 4])

$ python play.py 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "play.py", line 7, in <module>
    print Foo(None, [3, 4])
TypeError: tuple() takes at most 1 argument (2 given)

Why?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Because tuples are immutable, you have to override __new__ instead:

python docs

object.__new__(cls[, ...])

Called to create a new instance of class cls.__new__() is a static method (special-cased so you need not declare it as such) that takes the class of which an instance was requested as its first argument. The remaining arguments are those passed to the object constructor expression (the call to the class). The return value of __new__() should be the new object instance (usually an instance of cls).

Typical implementations create a new instance of the class by invoking the superclass’s __new__() method using super(currentclass, cls).__new__(cls[, ...]) with appropriate arguments and then modifying the newly-created instance as necessary before returning it.

If __new__() returns an instance of cls, then the new instance’s __init__() method will be invoked like __init__(self[, ...]), where self is the new instance and the remaining arguments are the same as were passed to __new__().

If __new__() does not return an instance of cls, then the new instance’s __init__() method will not be invoked.

__new__() is intended mainly to allow subclasses of immutable types (like int, str, or tuple) to customize instance creation. It is also commonly overridden in custom metaclasses in order to customize class creation.

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can someone tell me how to quote the whole block so the double underscores don't mean bold? –  gnibbler Oct 14 '09 at 10:32
    
Select the whole pasted text and click on the quote icon (black icon on top of the text box). –  Sridhar Ratnakumar Oct 14 '09 at 10:34
    
Didn't work but it did indent it a little –  gnibbler Oct 14 '09 at 10:42
    
I replaced them all with &#95; –  gnibbler Oct 14 '09 at 10:51
    
Inline code-tags are better in this example. –  Georg Schölly Oct 14 '09 at 10:55

To assign the tuple value you need to override the __new__ method:

class Foo(tuple):

    def __new__ (cls, a, b):
        return super(Foo, cls).__new__(cls, tuple(b))

The arguments seem to be ignored by the __init__ implementation of the tuple class, but if you need to do some init stuff you can do it as follows:

class Foo(tuple):

    def __new__ (cls, a, b):
        return super(Foo, cls).__new__(cls, tuple(b))

    def __init__(self, a, b):
        super(Foo, self).__init__(a,b)
        self.a=a
        self.b=b

if __name__ == '__main__':
    foo = Foo(None, [3, 4])
    print foo
    print foo.a
    print foo.b
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