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>>> text = '<a data-lecture-id="47"\n   data-modal-iframe="https://class.coursera.org/neuralnets-2012-001/lecture/view?lecture_id=47"\n   href="https://class.coursera.org/neuralnets-2012-001/lecture/47"\n   data-modal=".course-modal-frame"\n   rel="lecture-link"\n   class="lecture-link">\nAnother diversion: The softmax output function [7 min]</a>'

>>> import re
>>> re.findall(r'data-lecture-id="(\d+)"|(.*)</a>',a)
>>> [('47', ''), ('', 'Another diversion: The softmax output function [7 min]')]

How do i extract the data out like this:

>>> ['47', 'Another diversion: The softmax output function [7 min]']

I think there should be some smarter regex expressions.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a reason it has to be a smarter regex, rather than, say, not using a regex in the first place? –  abarnert Mar 27 '13 at 7:52

3 Answers 3

It is not recommended to parse HTML with reguar expressions. You can give a try to the xml.dom.minidom module:

from xml.dom.minidom import parseString

xml = parseString('<a data-lecture-id="47"\n   data-modal-iframe="https://class.coursera.org/neuralnets-2012-001/lecture/view?lecture_id=47"\n   href="https://class.coursera.org/neuralnets-2012-001/lecture/47"\n   data-modal=".course-modal-frame"\n   rel="lecture-link"\n   class="lecture-link">\nAnother diversion: The softmax output function [7 min]</a>')
anchor = xml.getElementsByTagName("a")[0]
print anchor.getAttribute("data-lecture-id"), anchor.childNodes[0].data
share|improve this answer

you use itertools

import re
from itertools import chain, ifilter

raw_found = re.findall(r'data-lecture-id="(\d+)"|(.*)</a>', text)

# simple
found = [x for x in chain(*raw_found) if x]

# or faster
found = [x for x in ifilter(None, chain(*raw_found))]

# or more compact, also just as fast
found = list(ifilter(None, chain(*raw_found)))

print found

Output:

['47', 'Another diversion: The softmax output function [7 min]']
share|improve this answer
    
I know some people hate filter(None, it), but I think it's more readable than [x for x in it if x]. (Not a complaint/correction/whatever; the OP should know how to read/write it both ways.) –  abarnert Mar 27 '13 at 7:52
    
@abarnert Honestly I've never seen that used before, I must admit it seems more pythonic, I'll have to research the advantages / disadv of both. or itertools.ifilter definitely sexy there. –  Serdalis Mar 27 '13 at 7:54
    
Well, the main disadvantage is that not everyone knows what it means. There's also the fact that many people who come from certain functional languages thing it's a bastardization of what filter should mean, while many who don't come from those languages hate filter (and map and reduce) in the first place. The only advantage is that it's more concise, and easier to read if you already know what it means. –  abarnert Mar 27 '13 at 7:59

I find a solution myself:

>>> re.findall('r'data-lecture-id="(\d+)"[\s\S]+>([\s\S]+)</a>',a)
>>> [('47', '\nAnother diversion: The softmax output function [7 min]')]

Looks better, but still have to iterate it to extract a simple list...

share|improve this answer
    
If you want to "flatten" a two-deep sequence like this, that's itertools.chain.from_iterable(x) (or, if it's an actual sequence rather than an arbitrary iterable, just itertools.chain(*x)). Serdalis's answer already explains this. –  abarnert Mar 27 '13 at 7:54

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