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I have class hierarchy like below.

class foo()
{
   function __construct($dfnname) {
      $this->callf = $dfnname;
   }
   function getd()
   {
      return call_user_func($this->callf);
   }
   function retrieve()
   {
      return $this->getd();
   }
}

class bar extends foo
{
   function getd()
   {
      return 'invalid call';
   }
   function getc()
   {
      return 'valid call';
   }
}

$ins = new bar('getc');
echo $ins->retrieve();

I am getting the answer 'invalid call'. I want to get the answer 'valid call'.

It might be because of from function foo=>retrieve(),it calls $this->getd(). and here instead of calling foo=>getd(), it is directly calling bar=>getd(), what should I do to call foo=>getd() from foo=>retrieve() and also call_user_func($this->callf) in foo=>getd() should call bar=>getc() function.

I know I am missing some basic inheritance concept. Please guide me.

share|improve this question
    
bar inherits all methods from foo. If bar overloads a method (like getd()), then when you call getd(), the implementation in de bar-class is used. It is indeed basic inheritance. I think it would be ok to read a bit more on OOP in general, since most of the principles are alike across languages –  qrazi Mar 27 '13 at 7:47
    
yes it is calling the bar-class function when I call getd() from parent, I want to call parent getd() from parent retrieve(), any way can I get it? –  Maulik Vora Mar 27 '13 at 7:52
    
No, you are missing the point of inheritance. You have an instance of bar, therefore you are calling retrieve() from the scope of bar, and retrieve() will therefore call bar::getd() and not foo::getd(). You can call the parent implementation from bar by using "return parent::getd()" which will effectively call foo::getd(), but then what added value has your bar::getd() implementation got? –  qrazi Mar 27 '13 at 7:57
    
You can get the method from the parent, but it's not a nice solution. In order to get the parent's method, change the retrieve method to: if (get_class($this) === 'bar') { return parent::getd();} return $this->getd(); –  Elias Van Ootegem Mar 27 '13 at 8:05
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1 Answer

Something like this?

class foo
{
   function __construct($dfnname) {
      $this->callf = $dfnname;
   }
   private function getd()
   {
      return call_user_func($this->callf);
   }

   private function getc()
   {

   }
   function retrieve()
   {
      return $this->getd();
   }
}

class bar extends foo
{


}

$ins = new bar('getc');
echo $ins->retrieve();

Did you read documentation about Visibility in PHP?

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