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i know that when creating a php website i can use something like: index.php?id=2 and the index.php can fetch the id with: $_GET['id']. I want to create an api for one of my websies and i see different examples.

Twitter:

https://api.twitter.com/1.1/statuses/mentions_timeline.json?count=2&since_id=14927799

So, i create a folder "1.1" and a folder "statuses" on my FTP-Server with the file mentions_timeline.json which understands $_GET['count'] etc. ?

Other APIs look like this:

https://quote.fm/api/recommendation/delete

And i can delete a recommendation with:

https://quote.fm/api/recommendation/delete/?id=1 or
https://quote.fm/api/recommendation/delete/1

Usually with websites i can create such url structure to make it work using mod_rewrite. As i understand here i create different urls for different sections:

https://xyz.com/api/user/get/1
https://xyz.com/api/user/delete/1

So i create a folder user with the subfolders delete and get on the FTP-Server, each having a index.php file? How does my script then know that /1 is id=1?

Does somebody understand me? I have difficulties to understand how my script can translate the url structure into necessary pieces of data that are coming from the app.

Thanks!

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closed as not constructive by mpm, NikiC, Phil, Steven Penny, Raghunandan Mar 27 '13 at 20:25

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You're either looking for "pretty URLs" (google it) or a full router (read this: github.com/deceze/…) –  deceze Mar 27 '13 at 9:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'll just copy this chapter from the readme of my router implementation here:

What URLs are and how to set up routing

A URL is simply a string consisting of several parts:

http://example.com/foo?bar=baz
  |         |       |    |
  |         |       |    +- query
  |         |       +- path
  |         +- host
  +- scheme

A URL may additionally have authentication information, a port and a fragment, but we'll try to keep it simple here. Kunststube\Router exclusively deals with the path. The scheme and query typically have no influence on routing and the host is typically handled by the web server.

Assuming a typical setup using an Apache web server, Apache usually does the "routing" for you. It receives an HTTP request looking something like this:

GET /foo/bar/baz?some=parameters HTTP/1.1

The web server is now free to respond to this request in any way it chooses. The default thing most web servers do is to map the URL's path to files on the hard disk. The web server will first figure out what the appropriate DocumentRoot is, i.e. the folder on disk that has been configured as "the public web folder". Let's assume the DocumentRoot is /var/www. It will then concatenate the request path to that root, resulting in /var/www/foo/bar/baz. It will then try to figure out if that file exists on disk and serve it up as response. If the requested file ends with .php or Apache is otherwise configured to treat the file as PHP file, it will first run the file through the PHP interpreter before returning its output.

To use our own custom routing using a PHP router, we need to intercept the process of Apache looking up the file to serve on disk. This can be done in the Apache configuration files; but if you have access to these files I'm assuming you know what you're doing and won't go into the specific details of the best setup there. Instead I'll cover the typical case where you cannot or don't want to edit the core Apache configuration files and instead resort to .htaccess files. When Apache traverses the directory structure on the disk to find the correct file to serve, it checks in each directory whether a file called .htaccess is placed in it. If it finds one, it will execute and/or incorporate the rules defined within it into the file lookup process, then continue on to the next deeper directory in the path.

What you want to achieve is to make Apache "find" and execute one particular PHP file for any and all requests and make the original URL available to that PHP file so it can do its own routing. The easiest, dirtiest way to do this is a simple RewriteRule:

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
    RewriteEngine On
    RewriteRule ^(.*)$ index.php?url=/$1 [QSA,L] 
</IfModule>

Lets assume you put this into the file /var/www/.htaccess. When Apache starts its file lookup in that directory, it will parse these rewrite rules. The "internal state" of the path Apache is looking for at this point is foo/bar/baz. The regular expression ^(.*)$ of the RewriteRule will match that path (the expression basically says "match anything"), and the rule will rewrite the path to index.php?url=/foo/bar/baz. The original some=parameters is then appended again to that path/URL (due to the QSA flag). Apache will then continue looking for the now rewritten path index.php. So just put your code into /var/www/index.php and Apache will launch the PHP interpreter for it. PHP will be passed the URL query part ?url=/foo/bar/baz&some=parameters, which in PHP can be accessed as $_GET['url'] and $_GET['some']. So the complete setup looks like this:

Basic setup

File/folder structure
/var
    /www
        .htaccess
        index.php
        /Kunststube
            /Router
                Router.php
                ...
.htaccess
<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
    RewriteEngine On
    RewriteRule ^(.*)$ index.php?url=/$1 [QSA,L] 
</IfModule>
index.php
<?php

require_once 'Kunststube/Router/Router.php';

$r = new Kunststube\Router\Router;
$r->add('/foo');
...
$r->route($_GET['url']);

And that's all there is to it. A basic rewrite rule that redirects every request to the same PHP file and appends the original URL as query parameter, which is then used to invoke the routing process.

Caveats and tweaks

One important caveat to the above setup is that your URL cannot contain a query parameter called url, since the original query parameters are added back onto the rewritten URL. The URL /foo/bar?url=baz would be rewritten to:

index.php?url=/foo/bar&url=baz

The second url parameter will replace the first. If you need to use the query parameter url in your application, choose a different parameter name for your rewrite rule.

Secondly, note that the Kunststube\Router expects the URL passed to route() to start with a /. You can add that slash during the rewriting process as shown above, or in PHP; just make sure it's there.

Third, you usually also have files you do not want to route through PHP, for example CSS and image files. You'll want those to be served by Apache directly. A good setup for this is as such:

/var
    /Kunststube
        /Router
            ...
    /MyApp
        MyScript.php
        ...
    /www
        .htaccess
        index.php
        /css
            style.css
            ...
        /img
            kitten.jpg
            ...

Take all the actual PHP files out of the public web root directory, only leave public asset files and a minimal index.php file in there. Adjust your RewriteRule to look like this:

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
    RewriteEngine On
    RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
    RewriteRule ^(.*)$ index.php?url=/$1 [QSA,L] 
</IfModule>

The RewriteCond makes sure the RewriteRule only applies if the requested file does not physically exist (!-f). That means requests for the URL css/style.css will pass through as is, since the file does actually exist and Apache can serve it directly. Any requests for "imaginary" files that do not physically exist will go into index.php and can be routed there. Inside index.php, make sure to use the correct path to the router:

require_once '../Kunststube/Router/Router.php';

In fact, it's better practice to define your routes elsewhere entirely and to use autoloaders to load required files, but this is outside the scope of this document.

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