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Can I propagate generic constraints on derived types that are declared in base class in C# ?

Example Program displays error :

The type 'T' cannot be used as type parameter 'T' in the generic type or method 'Test.Base'. There is no boxing conversion or type parameter conversion from 'T' to 'Test.IBase'.

interface IBase
{

}

class Base<T> where T : IBase
{


}

class Derived<T> : Base<T>
{

}
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I have already applied, but there is mistake in html formatting. so please check it again. –  Rajdip Patel Mar 27 '13 at 9:29

3 Answers 3

class Derived<T> : Base<T> where T : IBase
{

}
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This is repeat task that I have already done on base class. In C++ this is possible. Doesn't C# provide any trick for that ? –  Rajdip Patel Mar 27 '13 at 9:32
    
Unfortunately, in C# you should always define constraints in derived types. –  Rover Mar 27 '13 at 12:22

Should be:

class Derived<T> : Base<T> where T : IBase
{

}

Always explicitly put your constraints, because T is just a declaration, it's not the same T as the one in your base class.

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I'm not sure why this downvote is for. Can you elaborate? –  L-Three Mar 27 '13 at 9:54

In your Derived<T> class you haven't specified that T has to implement IBase and because it's used in as a type parameter in Base<T> you can't say any T can be used. Change it to this:

class Derived<T> : Base<T> where T : IBase
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This is repeat task that I have already done on base class. In C++ this is possible. Doesn't C# provide any trick for that ? –  Rajdip Patel Mar 27 '13 at 9:33
    
It's another T, you still have to constraint it; it doesn't know it's the same T as the base class. –  L-Three Mar 27 '13 at 9:36
    
@RajdipPatel: What L-Three said. Think of the T as a parameter for a method. Just because 2 parameters for methods are named the same doesn't mean they refer to the same thing. –  George Duckett Mar 27 '13 at 9:41

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