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I have a usual interface(that i do not want to make generic) with generic method Get and a generic class, that implements it.

@Override does not give me a warning and the code works as intended, but i have a warning in Foo#Get() : Type safety: The return type T for Get() from the type Test.Foo<T> needs unchecked conversion to conform to TT from the type Test.Attribute

Must i make Attribute Interface generic as well? I am trying to avoid manual messing with Object and casts and store all types of different attributes in a list.

(using static just to compile the test sample in one file - it does not change anything)

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Test
{
    static interface Attribute
    {
        <TT> TT Get();
    }

    static class Foo<T> implements Attribute
    {
        T val;

        public Foo(T val)
        {
            this.val = val;
        }

        @Override
        public T Get()
        {
            System.out.println("it is me");

            return val;
        }
    }


    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        List<Attribute> list = new ArrayList<Attribute>();

        list.add(new Foo<String>("test"));

        String s = list.get(0).Get();

        System.out.println(s);
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could make the Attribute interface generic, and then use a wildcard to allow Attributes of any type to be placed in a List:

List<Attribute<?>> list = new ArrayList<Attribute<?>>();

If you need to ensure that only one Attribute of each type can be placed in the container, just use a Set:

Set<Attribute<?>> set = new HashSet<Attribute<?>>();
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In order to use the interface without casting you will need to make the interface generic.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Test
{
    static interface Attribute<E> //Added Generic Param
    {
        <E> E Get();
    }

    static class Foo<T> implements Attribute<T> //Added Generic Param
    {
        T val;

        public Foo(T val)
        {
            this.val = val;
        }

        @Override
        public T Get()
        {
            System.out.println("it is me");

            return val;
        }
    }


    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        //Specify Type of generic
        List<Attribute<String>> list = new ArrayList<Attribute<String>>(); 

        list.add(new Foo<String>("test"));

        String s = list.get(0).Get();

        System.out.println(s);
    }
}
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The problem with the generic method in the base class is that someone could call it with an explicit type parameter. Which obviously would make no sense here, which is why the compiler is complaining.

It seems the best solution is to make your base class generic. If you want to store attributes of different types in a list, then you have a different problem; how are you going to get back to the original types (regardless of whether you're using generics)?

share|improve this answer
    
it will be used for some external abstract rules descriptions. I assume that user of this atributes knows about correct types, and if he fails - exception is ok –  ShPavel Mar 27 '13 at 10:10

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