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I have this html and css code:

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="a"></div>
    <div class="b"></div>
</div>

@media all and (max-width: 400px), (max-height: 300px) {
    .wrapper .a {
        ....
        ....
    }
    wrapper. .b {
        ....
        ....
    }
    ....
    ....
}

Now I want that whenever wrapper gets the class "like-small", all the styles of small screen will apply even if the screen is not small. I don't want to duplicate the css code inside the media query. How can I solve that?

Another solution is to force media query to apply. Is there any way to do it?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe with less. –  Jared Farrish Mar 27 '13 at 9:39
    
@JaredFarrish: Even with less, sass or stylus the rendered css will be duplicated. –  Naor Mar 27 '13 at 10:05
    
Interesting question, is it only for debug purpose ? –  zessx Mar 27 '13 at 11:14
1  
If you want to force media query to apply for debugging, you can do in it in Chrome. (dev tools, configuration, overrides). –  vals Mar 27 '13 at 14:46
    
@vals: And in production? :) –  Naor Mar 28 '13 at 13:58

4 Answers 4

In newer versions of Chrome you can "emulate" a mobile device in order to trigger / test your media queries in a desktop browser. (Internet Exploder 11 has the same behavior!) You may have to refresh the browser after applying the emulation; Chrome 35 still partially applies the media queries until I hit refresh in the associated tab.

share|improve this answer

You can do something like this with a bit of javascript.

In a nutshell, you'll move your media queries out of the css, and test them in JS using window.matchMedia.

When you know which one matched, you can add a className to the <html> tag, similar to the way Modernizr works. So on a phone you'd see <html class="like-small">.

Your css will be written to take advantage of those convenience classes, rather than using the native media query:

.like-small wrapper.a {}
.like-large wrapper.a {}

(I also like to add .not-like-small, .not-like-medium classes to <html> as well, to further simplify the css)

So now, after the regular media query is matched and the appropriate classname is appended to the document, RWD works pretty much as normal. And if you want to force a particular style you can just rewrite the classNames on the HTML tag to affect the entire page, or add a className to any parent element to affect only part of the page.

share|improve this answer

I know this question is old, but hopefully this is what you were looking for (as there wasn't an answer). And I also don't know if adding a specificity class to your CSS broke your requirement not to repeat CSS.

You can achieve what you want to do by changing the definition of your @media query. Basically, instead of saying you want something to happen when the screen gets smaller than a value, keep your small screen CSS OUT of the media query and have your media queries set up for larger screens.

Then, you just need to change the order that you call the CSS and add specificity to the styles where you want to call the class like-small.

HTML:

<div class="wrapper like-small">
    <div class="a"></div>
    <div class="b"></div>
</div>


<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="a"></div>
    <div class="b"></div>
</div>

CSS:

.wrapper.like-small .a,
.wrapper .a {
        height:200px;
        width:200px;
        background:purple;
    }

.wrapper.like-small .b,
    .wrapper .b {
       height:200px;
       width:200px;
       background:blue;
 }

@media all and (min-width: 400px), (min-height: 300px) {
    .wrapper .a {
        height:100px;
        width:100px;
    background:yellow;
    }
    .wrapper .b {
       height:100px;
        width:100px;
    background:red;
    }
}

And the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/disinfor/70n37hhj/

Hopefully this is what you were after (over a year and a half ago :)

share|improve this answer

Add the same class for those sections.

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="makeMeShine a"></div>
    <div class="makeMeShine b"></div>
</div>

Where a and b can have their own custom styles :)

share|improve this answer
    
What is "makeMeShine"? How does this has connection to the media query?.. –  Naor Mar 27 '13 at 10:06
    
makeMeShine is just a class that I added. for instance .makeMeShine{ background: red; } . Eveywhere the class makeMeShine is applied you'll have background red. –  Axente Paul Mar 27 '13 at 11:25
    
And how does this relates to media query???.. –  Naor Mar 27 '13 at 13:13
    
Axente Paul definitely didn't understood your question. –  zessx Mar 27 '13 at 14:56

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