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I'm confused on how many flops per cycle per core can be done with Sandy-Bridge and Haswell. As I understand it with SSE it should be 4 flops per cycle per core for SSE and 8 flops per cycle per core for AVX/AVX2.

This seems to be verified here, how to achieve 4 flops per cycle ,and here, Sandy-Bridge CPU specification.

However the link below seems to indicate that Sandy-bridge can do 16 flops per cycle per core and Haswell 32 flops per cycle per core http://www.extremetech.com/computing/136219-intels-haswell-is-an-unprecedented-threat-to-nvidia-amd.

Can someone explain this to me?

Edit: I understand now why I was confused. I thought the term FLOP only referred to single floating point (SP). I see now that the test at how to achieve 4 flops per cycle are actually on double floating point (DP) so they achieve 4 DP FLOPs/cycle for SSE and 8 DP FLOPs/cycle for AVX. It would be interesting to redo these test on SP.

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In response to your edit: The numbers would be exactly double the DP numbers. That's because the latencies and throughputs are identical for the SP and DP versions of the SIMD instructions. (In some cases, the SP ones have even lower latency.) – Mysticial Mar 27 '13 at 13:29
    
I have converted the code to use SP as best as I understand and compiled it with Visual Studio 2012. However, I don't see a difference in speed and the sum reports an error so likely I need to change some more code. I'll have to get back to this. – user2088790 Mar 27 '13 at 14:25
    
You need to double the numbers since the counter is assuming DP. (Change: 48 * 1000 * iterations * tds * 2 to 48 * 1000 * iterations * tds * 4) Furthermore, you need to change the renormalization mask to work on SP: uint64 iMASK = 0x800fffffffffffffull; – Mysticial Mar 27 '13 at 14:31
    
4 due to four SP floats per SSE register. Thanks again. I also changed the renormalization mask to unsigned int iMASK = 0x80fffffu. Now it works and I get twice like you said. – user2088790 Mar 27 '13 at 15:08
1  
Yep. Enjoy. :) I hope to write a similar benchmark for FMA when I get my hands on the right hardware. – Mysticial Mar 27 '13 at 15:16
up vote 71 down vote accepted

Here are FLOPs counts for a number of recent processor microarchitectures and explanation how to achieve them:

Intel Core 2 and Nehalem:

  • 4 DP FLOPs/cycle: 2-wide SSE2 addition + 2-wide SSE2 multiplication
  • 8 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide SSE addition + 4-wide SSE multiplication

Intel Sandy Bridge/Ivy Bridge:

  • 8 DP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide AVX addition + 4-wide AVX multiplication
  • 16 SP FLOPs/cycle: 8-wide AVX addition + 8-wide AVX multiplication

Intel Haswell/Broadwell/Skylake:

  • 16 DP FLOPs/cycle: two 4-wide FMA (fused multiply-add) instructions
  • 32 SP FLOPs/cycle: two 8-wide FMA (fused multiply-add) instructions

AMD K10:

  • 4 DP FLOPs/cycle: 2-wide SSE2 addition + 2-wide SSE2 multiplication
  • 8 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide SSE addition + 4-wide SSE multiplication

AMD Bulldozer/Piledriver/Steamroller, per module (two cores):

  • 8 DP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide FMA
  • 16 SP FLOPs/cycle: 8-wide FMA

Intel Atom (Bonnell/45nm, Saltwell/32nm, Silvermont/22nm):

  • 1.5 DP FLOPs/cycle: scalar SSE2 addition + scalar SSE2 multiplication every other cycle
  • 6 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide SSE addition + 4-wide SSE multiplication every other cycle

AMD Bobcat:

  • 1.5 DP FLOPs/cycle: scalar SSE2 addition + scalar SSE2 multiplication every other cycle
  • 4 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide SSE addition every other cycle + 4-wide SSE multiplication every other cycle

AMD Jaguar:

  • 3 DP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide AVX addition every other cycle + 4-wide AVX multiplication in four cycles
  • 8 SP FLOPs/cycle: 8-wide AVX addition every other cycle + 8-wide AVX multiplication every other cycle

ARM Cortex-A9:

  • 1.5 DP FLOPs/cycle: scalar addition + scalar multiplication every other cycle
  • 4 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide NEON addition every other cycle + 4-wide NEON multiplication every other cycle

ARM Cortex-A15:

  • 2 DP FLOPs/cycle: scalar FMA or scalar multiply-add
  • 8 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide NEONv2 FMA or 4-wide NEON multiply-add

Qualcomm Krait:

  • 2 DP FLOPs/cycle: scalar FMA or scalar multiply-add
  • 8 SP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide NEONv2 FMA or 4-wide NEON multiply-add

IBM PowerPC A2 (Blue Gene/Q), per core:

  • 8 DP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide QPX FMA every cycle
  • SP elements are extended to DP and processed on the same units

IBM PowerPC A2 (Blue Gene/Q), per thread:

  • 4 DP FLOPs/cycle: 4-wide QPX FMA every other cycle
  • SP elements are extended to DP and processed on the same units

Intel Xeon Phi (Knights Corner), per core:

  • 16 DP FLOPs/cycle: 8-wide FMA every cycle
  • 32 SP FLOPs/cycle: 16-wide FMA every cycle

Intel Xeon Phi (Knights Corner), per thread:

  • 8 DP FLOPs/cycle: 8-wide FMA every other cycle
  • 16 SP FLOPs/cycle: 16-wide FMA every other cycle

The reason why there are per-thread and per-core datum for IBM Blue Gene/Q and Intel Xeon Phi (Knights Corner) is that these cores have a higher instruction issue rate when running more than one thread per core.

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Thanks! I see now that the the link stackoverflow.com/questions/8389648/… is testing DP FLOPSs/cycle and not SP FLOPs/cycle. I wonder if I changed the code the code to be SP (_ps instead of _pd) if I will get 16 SP FLOPS/cycle on my Sandy Bridge system? For Nvidia Fermi I read en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeForce_500_Series "Each SP can fulfil up to two single precision operations FMA per clock". I guess that's similar to Haswell which can do 2 FMA instructions/cycle. – user2088790 Mar 27 '13 at 13:22
    
If you change _ps to _pd you will double the performance. Whether you will get 16 SP FLOPs/cycle depends on the other parts of your code (e.g. how many memory loads it perform). – Marat Dukhan Mar 27 '13 at 14:03
3  
DP support was added in SSE2 as well – Marat Dukhan Mar 27 '13 at 15:30
3  
Cortex-M0 and M3 don’t even have FPUs, so they do zero FLOPs/cycle. Even on M4 the FPU is optional. Cortex-A8 can do 2 SP FLOPs/cycle with NEON. Double-precision … well, VFP isn't pipelined on A8, so it’s about 1/8 DP FLOPs/cycle. – Stephen Canon Dec 5 '13 at 20:53
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@netvope They are per-module – Marat Dukhan May 3 '14 at 2:23

The throughput for Haswell is lower for addition than for multiplication and FMA. There are two multiplication/FMA units, but only one f.p. add unit. If your code contains mainly additions then you have to replace the additions by FMA instructions with a multiplier of 1.0 to get the maximum throughput.

The latency of FMA instructions on Haswell is 5 and the throughput is 2 per clock. This means that you must keep 10 parallel operations going to get the maximum throughput. If, for example, you want to add a very long list of f.p. numbers, you would have to split it in ten parts and use ten accumulator registers.

This is possible indeed, but who would make such a weird optimization for one specific processor?

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You don't need to manually break the loop, a little bit of compiler unrolling and out-of-order HW (assuming you don't have dependencies) can let you reach a considerable throughput bottleneck. Add to that hyperthreading and 2 operations per clock become quite necessary. – Leeor Nov 23 '13 at 15:15
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@Leeor, maybe you could post some code to show this? Unrolling 10 times with FMA gives me the best result. See my answer at stackoverflow.com/questions/21090873/… – Z boson Feb 6 '14 at 19:50
    
Most HPC codes that are compute-bound (i.e. flop-bound) do a lot of FMA. In my experience, the places where one does a lot of add are bandwidth-bound such that more add throughput won't help. – Jeff Jan 15 at 14:49
    
The newest Intel generation has a more balanced throughput. Floating point addition, multiplication and FMA all have a throughput of 2 instructions per clock cycle and a latency of 4. – A Fog Jan 16 at 16:06

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