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Suppose that on a C implementation (e.g. on a x86 C compiler) USHRT_MAX = 65535 and INT_MAX = 2147483647. Is, then, the following statement well-defined?

unsigned short product = USHRT_MAX * USHRT_MAX;

According to the following in the C99 standard both operands are promoted to int (since int can represent all possible values of unsigned short) and, therefore, the result is not well-defined, since an overflow will occur (65535 ^ 2 = 4294836225 > 2147483647), which means that the value of product is not well-defined:

6.3.1.1-1

If an int can represent all values of the original type, the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int. These are called the integer promotions.(48) All other types are unchanged by the integer promotions.

48) The integer promotions are applied only: as part of the usual arithmetic conversions, to certain argument expressions, to the operands of the unary +, -, and ~ operators, and to both operands of the shift operators, as specified by their respective subclauses.

However, according to the following, the result is well-defined, since computations involving unsigned operands do not overflow:

6.2.5-9

The range of nonnegative values of a signed integer type is a subrange of the corresponding unsigned integer type, and the representation of the same value in each type is the same.(31) A computation involving unsigned operands can never overflow, because a result that cannot be represented by the resulting unsigned integer type is reduced modulo the number that is one greater than the largest value that can be represented by the resulting type.

Does the variable product in the aforementioned statement have a well-defined value?

EDIT: What should happen in the following case?

unsigned short lhs = USHRT_MAX;
unsigned short rhs = USHRT_MAX;
unsigned short product = lhs * rhs;
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2  
Moral: don't use types smaller than int for arithmetic, the rules are just too confusing to allow for mortal programmers to write correct code... –  Steve Jessop Mar 27 '13 at 11:15
    
There's no difference between the two pieces of code. Promotions to int will occur irrespective of whether you use a constant or a variable. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 27 '13 at 11:17
2  
Just as a nitpick, there is no promotion to int in the first case. USHRT_MAX as given is an int. The whole picture would change if it would be declared as 65535U. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 27 '13 at 11:35
    
@JensGustedt: which it can't be, since C99 says "the following shall be replaced by expressions that have the same type as would an expression that is an object of the corresponding type converted according to the integer promotions". So there's no promotion, but USHRT_MAX has the same type as it would have if there were a promotion (and hence it would have type unsigned int on some hypothetical implementation in which short and int are the same width). Good spot. –  Steve Jessop Mar 27 '13 at 11:49
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The promotion wins.

Says section 5.2.4.2.1 about the constants USHRT_MAX etc.:

The values given below shall be replaced by constant expressions suitable for use in #if preprocessing directives. Moreover, except for CHAR_BIT and MB_LEN_MAX, the following shall be replaced by expressions that have the same type as would an expression that is an object of the corresponding type converted according to the integer promotions.

So the multiplication is on ints, and involves no unsigned operands, unambiguously, there is no conforming way to implement USHRT_MAX to get an operation involving unsigned operands if USHRT_MAX < INT_MAX. Thus you have overflow, and undefined behaviour.

Regarding the added question

EDIT: What should happen in the following case?

unsigned short lhs = USHRT_MAX;
unsigned short rhs = USHRT_MAX;
unsigned short product = lhs * rhs;

That is exactly the same situation. The operands of * are subject to the integer promotions, all values of type unsigned short can be represented as ints by the assumption on the values of USHRT_MAX and INT_MAX, so the multiplication is on ints, and with the specified values overflows.

You need to convert at least one operand to an unsigned type that is not promoted to int in oerder to have the multiplication be performed on unsigned operands.

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You get UB since by the time the multiplication operator is applied, its operands are already signed integers (because of the promotions to int occurring first).

You can work-around that with this:

unsigned short product = USHRT_MAX * (unsigned)USHRT_MAX;

Proof that (unsigned)some_integer stays unsigned:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
  printf("1u * (-1) = %f\n", (((unsigned)1) * (-1)) + 0.0);
  printf("1 * (-1) = %f\n", (1 * (-1)) + 0.0);
  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

1u * (-1) = 4294967295.000000
1 * (-1) = -1.000000

Good catch, btw.

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This won't work. According to the usual arithmetic conversions: "Otherwise, if the type of the operand with signed integer type can represent all of the values of the type of the operand with unsigned integer type, then the operand with unsigned integer type is converted to the type of the operand with signed integer type." So both operands are promoted to int and an overflow occurs. –  Alexandros Mar 27 '13 at 10:51
    
This will work. An unsigned int won't get magically converted into a signed int. No way. See the update. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 27 '13 at 11:08
    
@Alexandros: it will work, because an unsigned stays the same under integer promotion (6.3.1.1/2, "An object or expression with an integer type (other than int or unsigned int)...". So the unsigned operand is not converted to int, although the USHRT_MAX is converted to int. Next, the "usual arithmetic conversions" select unsigned for the multiplication. –  Steve Jessop Mar 27 '13 at 11:09
    
@SteveJessop Interpret it as no practical way then. :) –  Alexey Frunze Mar 27 '13 at 11:11
    
@AlexeyFrunze: actually, sorry, I think I was wrong and you're right that there's no way. I've edited my first comment, the text defining integer promotions excludes unsigned int. –  Steve Jessop Mar 27 '13 at 11:13
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