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Is there a more elegant way of ensuring a constructor is always called with at least one value than what I've got here? I have done it this way as I want a compiler error if no values are provided.

public class MyClass
{
    private readonly List<string> _things = new List<string>();
    public string[] Things { get { return _things.ToArray(); } }

    public MyClass(string thing, params string[] things)
    {
        _things.Add(thing);
        _things.AddRange(things);
    }
}

EDIT

Based on the comments, I have changed the code to this ...

public class Hypermedia : Attribute
{
    private readonly Rel[] _relations;
    public IEnumerable<Rel> Relations { get { return _relations; } }

    public Hypermedia(Rel relation, params Rel[] relations)
    {
        var list = new List<Rel> {relation};
        list.AddRange(relations);
        _relations = list.ToArray();
    }
}

Apologies for editing the code before in an attempt to hide what I was trying to do. It's easier to just paste straight from my code editor!

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3  
The caller could still pass null as thing –  Nicholas Butler Mar 27 '13 at 10:51
1  
If you are looking for another addition, use a method to return the array rather than a property, as a developer can do a loop using x.Things.Count, which call .ToArray() on every iteration. Reference: msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/vstudio/… - "Do use a method, rather than a property, in the following situations." under the bullet point "The operation returns an array." –  Dominic Zukiewicz Mar 27 '13 at 10:53
1  
@AntonyScott Be careful returning the same array every time. If you return the actual object reference, the calling code can modify its contents; I suspect this may not be desired. x.Things[0] = "Hello World!"; Instead you may consider returning some non-alterable enumerable for the .Things property, and storing Count as a readonly constant pre-calculated in the constructor. –  Chris Sinclair Mar 27 '13 at 10:58
1  
@AntonyScott Unfortunately, this isn't much better. The calling code can cast it back to the array and alter values. Perhaps consider using foreach and yield return the values (or returning an iterator) –  Chris Sinclair Mar 27 '13 at 11:23
1  
@AntonyScott For sure, I totally get avoiding over-engineering code, especially when it's for internal use. A really quick way is to have foreach(var thing in Things) yield return thing; for the property body. And you're right; probably overkill for your usage in this sense. –  Chris Sinclair Mar 27 '13 at 12:21

2 Answers 2

What about Code Contracts?

public MyClass(params string[] things)
{
    Contract.Requires(things != null && things.Any());
    _things.AddRange(things);
}

Code contracts include classes for marking your code, a static analyzer for compile-time analysis, and a runtime analyzer.

At least you'll get the warning from static analyzer. And you can turn off runtime analysis in Release mode to avoid performance hit.

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1  
+1 for Code contracts..!! –  Rohit Vats Mar 27 '13 at 10:59
    
useful to know, but not quite what I was after. –  Antony Scott Mar 27 '13 at 11:02

I believe you are looking for the RequiredAttribute (available since .NET 3.5)

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.dataannotations.requiredattribute.aspx for more information.

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2  
Isn't that for form/input/database validation? –  Chris Sinclair Mar 27 '13 at 10:53

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