Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently made a website that needs to retrieve talk titles from TED website.

So far, the problem is specific to this talk: Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now

From the web page source, I get:

<title>Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now | Video on TED.com</title>
<span id="altHeadline" >Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now</span>

Now, in ghci, I tried this:

λ> :m +Network.HTTP Text.Regex.PCRE
λ> let uri = "http://www.ted.com/talks/francis_collins_we_need_better_drugs_now.html"
λ> body <- (simpleHTTP $ getRequest uri) >>= getResponseBody
λ> body =~ "<span id=\"altHeadline\" >(.+)</span>" :: [[String]]
[["id=\"altHeadline\" >Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now</span>\n\t\t</h","s Collins: We need better drugs -- now</span"]]
λ> body =~ "<title>(.+)</title>" :: [[String]]
[["tle>Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now | Video on TED.com</title>\n<l","ncis Collins: We need better drugs -- now | Video on TED.com</t"]]

Either way, the parsed title misses some characters on the left, and has some unintended characters on the right. It seems to have something to do with the -- in talk title. However,

λ> let body' = "<title>Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now | Video on TED.com</title>"
λ> body' =~ "<title>(.+)</title>" :: [[String]]
[["<title>Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now | Video on TED.com</title>","Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now | Video on TED.com"]]

Luckily, this is not a problem with Text.Regex.Posix.

λ> import qualified Text.Regex.Posix as P
λ> body P.=~ "<title>(.+)</title>" :: [[String]]
[["<title>Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now | Video on TED.com</title>","Francis Collins: We need better drugs -- now | Video on TED.com"]]
share|improve this question
    
Change .+ to .+? –  Ben Hanson Mar 27 '13 at 11:56
    
@BenHanson Same result. –  rnons Mar 27 '13 at 12:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My recommendation would be: don't use a regex for parsing HTML. Use a proper HTML parser instead. Here's an example using the html-conduit parser together with the xml-conduit cursor library (and http-conduit for download).

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
import           Data.Monoid          (mconcat)
import           Network.HTTP.Conduit (simpleHttp)
import           Text.HTML.DOM        (parseLBS)
import           Text.XML.Cursor      (attributeIs, content, element,
                                       fromDocument, ($//), (&//), (>=>))

main = do
    lbs <- simpleHttp "http://www.ted.com/talks/francis_collins_we_need_better_drugs_now.html"
    let doc = parseLBS lbs
        cursor = fromDocument doc
    print $ mconcat $ cursor $// element "title" &// content
    print $ mconcat $ cursor $// element "span" >=> attributeIs "id" "altHeadline" &// content

The code is also available as active code on the School of Haskell.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion. I know when programming in haskell, there always are multiple ways to solve the same problem. But as a beginner, I'm content with mere working code. I sure will take your advice when refactoring. –  rnons Mar 27 '13 at 13:10
1  
This wasn't Haskell-specific advice. Using a regex for HTML/XML parsing is generally not a good idea. Have a look at: stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348/… –  Michael Snoyman Mar 27 '13 at 14:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.