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There is a use of a local variable as an optimization at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_checked_locking_pattern#Usage_in_Java from Joshua Bloch "Effective Java, Second Edition", p. 283 to make it 25% faster on "some versions of the Java VM". Does this kind of local variable benefit apply when the relevant variable is static too, and does it apply to Android?

So which of these getInstance()s is faster on Android (or are they the same?):

A:

class Something {

    private static volatile Something instance = null;

    public static Something getInstance(Context context) {
        Something local = instance;
        if (local==null) {
            synchronized(Something.class) {
                local = instance;
                if (local==null) {
                    instance = local = new Something(context);
                }
            }
        }
        return local;
    }
}

or

B.

class Something {

    private static volatile Something instance = null;

    public static Something getInstance(Context context) {
        if (instance==null) {
            synchronized(Something.class) {
                if (instance == null) {
                    instance = new Something(context);
                }
            }
        }
        return instance;
    }
}

and why?

(Don't worry, the Something doesn't keep a reference to context, it just uses it temporarily as it needs it for instantiation, which is why it seems I need the instantiation to be "lazy".)

If your answer is "just test it", can you give me the steps to do so? But I'd like to know the reasons for the differences anyway if there are any (which there might not be anyway).

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1 Answer

I think the fastest way is to skip the double check and work with a still thread safe way:

public final class Foo {
    private static volatile Foo mInstance      = new Foo();

    private Foo() {
        // do what ever you want
    }

    /**
     * @return The singleton object
     */
    public static Foo getInstance() {
        return mInstance;
    }

    /**
     * @return the singleton object with new context
     */
    public static Foo getInstance(Context context) {
        mInstance.setContext(context); // just as an example
        return mInstance;
    }
}
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My "Foo" is invalid without the info obtained using the context, and my "setContext" must be synchronized, so calling getInstance(Context) every time in this way may have to incur the "lock-obtaining/releasing" overhead on each call. –  Navigateur Mar 27 '13 at 12:17
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