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I am completely stumped on what the heck is going on with an insert. Basically, I'm trying to do the right thing by storing everything in the database in UTC and then converting to local timezone based on the user's information. I have numerous queries that are working just fine, but this one insert query is throwing a wrench into the works.

$adt = date('Y-m-d') . " " . $_POST['Time'];
echo $adt;
$tmp_dt = new DateTime($adt, new DateTimeZone($tz));
echo $tmp_dt->format('H:i:s');  
$tmp_dt->setTimezone(new DateTimeZone('UTC'));
$UTC_time = $tmp_dt->format('H:i:s');
echo $UTC_time;

echo 'date_default_timezone_set: ' . date_default_timezone_get() . '<br />';
mysql_select_db($db_name, $JewelryDB);
mysql_query("SET time_zone = '+00:00';");

$updateSQL = sprintf("INSERT INTO reminder_cfg 
                    (id, day_of, day_of_advance, day_prior, default_time, week_prior, 2_week_prior, 3_week_prior, 4_week_prior, 5_week_prior, day_after, 2_week_after, 50_day_after) 
                    VALUES (%s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s)
                    ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE day_of = %s, day_of_advance = %s, day_prior = %s, default_time = %s, week_prior = %s, 2_week_prior = %s, 3_week_prior = %s, 4_week_prior = %s, 5_week_prior = %s, day_after = %s, 2_week_after = %s, 50_day_after = %s",
                   GetSQLValueString($jeweler, "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['DayOf'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['Advance'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['DayPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($UTC_time, "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['WeekPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['2WeeksPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['3WeeksPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['4WeeksPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['5WeeksPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['DayAfter'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['2WeeksAfter'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['50DaysAfter'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['DayOf'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['Advance'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['DayPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['Time'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['WeekPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['2WeeksPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['3WeeksPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['4WeeksPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['5WeeksPrior'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['DayAfter'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['2WeeksAfter'], "text"),
                   GetSQLValueString($_POST['50DaysAfter'], "text"));

$Result1 = mysql_query($updateSQL, $JewelryDB) or die("Insert query error: " . mysql_error());

The echo statements in the code show that my timezone conversion is working as expected, but the insert statement is somehow subtracting 5 hours to insert the time in the local timezone. This is a shared/hosted server so I can't simply set the system time to UTC. I thought that the MySQL "SET time_zone" would correct this.

Please help. This is driving me nuts.

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1  
Better to store in timestamp. – Suresh Kamrushi Mar 27 '13 at 12:18
    
As an aside to your question, PHP functions that start with mysql_ have been deprecated as of PHP 5.5.0. If you are in a position to do so, please consider updating your code to use the MySQLi or PDO extensions instead. – dnagirl Mar 27 '13 at 12:21
    
You can use CONVERT_TZ. – fedorqui Mar 27 '13 at 12:22
2  
@SureshKamrushi: storing as Unix timestamps exchanges one set of problems for another. You lose all the flexibility and datatype enforcement rules of the DATETIME SQL datatype and associated functions; you're limited to the Unix era; you still have to ensure that you're storing a UTC value rather than a local value. – dnagirl Mar 27 '13 at 12:28
1  
First off... Thanks for the warning about the MYSQLi, and I am hoping to get to converting everything in the near future. Right now I'm trying to resolve a few major bugs before I look into that. – user2215489 Mar 27 '13 at 12:43

Mysql makes a distinction between the timestamp data type and the confusingly similar datetime data type. The datetime type has an implicit time zone (defined by you according to the weather outside your window), while the values stored in the timestamp type are implicitly converted to unixtime (UTC). If you want your time zone conversions to stick, you should store your values as datetime rather than timestamp.

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