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I have a std::string of eight characters and an index value (int) of a drop down control. I have only 8 bytes to store all the data.

Is it possible to compress the 8 chars into 7 bytes in order to spare the eighth byte for the index value?

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2  
If all the chars are 1-127 ASCII, then yes, it's possible. –  Mysticial Mar 27 '13 at 12:17
4  
Not without losing info. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 27 '13 at 12:17
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Wait - "I have only 8 bytes to store all the data." what? –  Luchian Grigore Mar 27 '13 at 12:19
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@WaqasDanish: 8 hex digits = 4 bytes... –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 27 '13 at 12:23
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A std::string with eight characters already takes up more than a total of eight bytes. So, you already failed. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 27 '13 at 12:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, assuming your characters only take on values in the standard ASCII character set.

If this assumption is correct, then they only take on values 0-127 (i.e. 7-bit values). So you only have 8 * 7 bits of information. And you have 7 * 8 bits to store this in. So just strip out the MSB of each char, and pack them.


However, this seems like an awful lot of work just to save a single byte. Do you really need to do this?

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He has 8 bytes and he wants to put them in a 7 byte container.... wording is odd –  user195488 Mar 27 '13 at 12:19
    
@0A0D: Yes, which is why this only works if one assumes ASCII-valued characters. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 27 '13 at 12:20
unsigned long long pack(const std::string& s, unsigned index)
{
    return (s[0] & 127)
         | (s[1] & 127) << 7
         | (s[2] & 127) << 14
         | (s[3] & 127) << 21
         | (s[4] & 127) << 28
         | (s[5] & 127) << 35
         | (s[6] & 127) << 42
         | (s[7] & 127) << 49
         |     index    << 56;
}
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There's a slight problem here, UB. s[] returns char or int and you can't shift that by more than the number of bits in int minus 1. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 27 '13 at 14:07
    
And how to convert back to string and index value? –  Waqas Danish Mar 27 '13 at 15:05

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