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I'm updating a website to use some HTML5 structural elements.

I've read lots of articles, but I'm still not 100% clear.

The question I have is regarding the content, rather than header or footer elements. Here is a typical example:

<div id="main-content" class="grid-8">
    <section>
        <h1 class="grey-heading">How It Works</h1>
        // some section content here  
    </section>
</div>
<div id="sidebar" class="grid-4">
    <aside>
        // some related stuff here
     </aside>
</div>

As you can see, its a simple main content/sidebar setup. The question is, am I right in keeping the structural divs (because thats all they do), or is it ok to add the structural stuff in with the content? In other words, remove the divs and add classes/id's to the sections and asides?

Thanks.

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4  
The whole point of these HTML5 tags is to make <div>s less generic. You should replace the <div>s with them. –  Niet the Dark Absol Mar 27 '13 at 13:16
1  
I found this poster helpful: sitepoint.com/… –  isherwood Mar 27 '13 at 13:17
    
in this case, if you have id="sidebar", whats the point in using aside. just use the aside –  ashley Mar 27 '13 at 13:19
    
@ashley - the sidebar may contain other things as well –  dotnetnoob Mar 27 '13 at 13:36
    
Divs are not deprecated they are just the goto tag when there's nothing more specific and you just need a tag to divide that section of your code. –  Alex W Mar 27 '13 at 13:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your wrappers should be replaced with the new tags, like Kolink said.

For example, your class="main-wrapper" could be replaced with the <main> tag. Likewise, why are you wrapping your sidebar when <aside> would be fully customisable?

<main>
    <section>
        <p>content</p>
    </section>
<main>

<aside>
    <p>content</p>
</aside>

All of these can have specific CSS layout ruling for them, making your markup 'readable' and easy to understand. Obviously, you may need classes, but this may help your workload by using new and pre-existing tags instead of arbitrary <div>s

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If you want to support older browsers you will need the html5 shiv. –  Alex W Mar 27 '13 at 13:44
1  
The <main> tag is not supported in browsers at the moment, it's not even finalized in the spec! Be aware, do not use it without shims. –  Ceane Lamerez Mar 27 '13 at 18:09

You can replace them if your styles allow, they provide additional semantic meaning to the browser which is particularly useful to assistive technologies and web crawlers. Your markup is perfectly fine but feel free to remove the <div>s if you don't need them for styling. Also you may want to use <nav> on your sidebar if it's for navigation.

I'd like to emphasise that it's up to you whether you keep the <div>s or not, if you provide the HTML5 semantic tags then you are losing no meaning by having 20 inner <div>s for your layout if you want them for styling or organisation. The HTML5 semantic tags are just like <div>s apart from the fact they carry the additional semantic meaning.

Here is an example HTML5 layout:

<header></header>
<nav></nav>
<section>
   <header></header>
   <article></article>
   <article></article>
   <footer></footer>
</section>
<aside></aside>
<footer></footer>

Also make sure you use a library like modernizr as a polyfill for older browsers if you're using the HTML5 tags.

Reference

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http://html5doctor.com/element-index

here you can read useful resources

The div element has no special meaning at all. It represents its children. It can be used with the class, lang, and title attributes to mark up semantics common to a group of consecutive elements.

and

Section represents a generic document or application section. In this context, a section is a thematic grouping of content, typically with a header, possibly with a footer. Examples include chapters in a book, the various tabbed pages in a tabbed dialog box, or the numbered sections of a thesis. A web site's home page could be split into sections for an introduction, news items, contact information.

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HTML5 elements that are assigned classes/id are not fully supported across browsers. For example, if aside had a class and you tried to add css to that class, it would not render. If you use HTML5 Shiv though, it should fix this issue and then your code will be cleaner and just awesome!

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