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I'm looking for a way to maintain a connecion with the python socketserver. I want to avoid the following situations.

Polling the input

Example:

class SingleTCPHandler(SocketServer.StreamRequestHandler):
    def handle(self):
        while True:
            message = self.rfile.readline().strip()
            ... do something with message

What I'm doing is continuously checking if something has been received. I want to avoid this because the server is ran on Raspberry pi so I want as minimum unnecessary computation as possible.


Update: 3/28/2013

It seems that the socket.recv() is a blocking call. According to the documentation for socketserver:

The difference is that the readline() call in the second handler will call recv() multiple times until it encounters a newline character, while the single recv() call in the first handler will just return what has been sent from the client in one sendall() call.

Which means that if socket.recv() is a blocking call, then the while True doesn't result in constant checking if a new message has arrived and doesn't consume the processor as I initially thought.


One connection per message

Example:

class SingleTCPHandler(SocketServer.StreamRequestHandler):
    def handle(self):
        while True:
            message = self.rfile.readline().strip()
            ... do something with message

This closes the connection once the message is received. However, the messages are sent every 60ms so the client initializes a new connection every time. This brings an overhead to a connection which should be as quick as possible.

Question

Is there a way to get some sort of 'interrupt' every time the message is received?

(Conceptual) Example:

class SingleTCPHandler(SocketServer.StreamRequestHandler):
    def handle(self):
        if interrupt:
            message = self.rfile.readline().strip()
            ... do something with message

I asked a similar question before, however this question sums up the essence of the problems which were not directly approached in the former question.

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Take a look at: docs.python.org/2/library/asyncore.html –  spartacus Mar 27 '13 at 15:46
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1 Answer 1

I went ahead and implemented a version for my own benefit.

import asyncore, socket, time, signal, sys

finished = None

class EchoHandler(asyncore.dispatcher_with_send):

    def handle_read(self):
        data = self.recv(8192)
        if data:
            self.send(data)

    def handle_close(self):
        print 'Closing connection from %s' % repr(self.getpeername())
        self.close()

class Listner(asyncore.dispatcher):

    def __init__(self, host, port):
        asyncore.dispatcher.__init__(self)
        self.create_socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        self.set_reuse_addr()
        self.bind((host, port))
        self.listen(5)
        self.number_accepted = 1

    def handle_accept(self):
        pair = self.accept()
        if pair is not None:
            sock, addr = pair
            print 'Incoming connection from %s' % repr(addr)
            handler = EchoHandler(sock)
            self.number_accepted-=1
        if self.number_accepted < 0:
            finished = 1

client = Listner('127.0.0.1', 1033)
asyncore.loop()

while not finished:
    time.sleep(1)
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