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I need to parse a config file file, in order to be able add/delete/modify the software configuration, that's defined by multiple blocks of text of format like that:

portsbuild {
        path = /jails/portsbuild;
        allow.mount;
        mount.devfs;
        host.hostname = portsbuild.home;
        ip4.addr = 192.168.0.200;
        interface = nfe0;
        exec.start = "/bin/sh /etc/rc";
        exec.stop = "/bin/sh /etc/rc.shutdown";
}

The blocks are fairly repetitive, and so far, only the values of the variables are changing.

I've tried using the re module, but the code I ended up with was too bloated and complicated. Then I've tried the iscpy module and the code was amazingly simple (one line to convert entire file into a handy dictionary) but the parsed data wasnt exactly what it should be:

>>> conf = iscpy.ParseISCString(open('/etc/jail.conf', 'r').read())
>>> conf
{'portsbuild': {'allow.mount': True, 'interface = nfe0': True, 'exec.start = "/bin/sh /etc/rc"': True, 'ip4.addr': '= 192.168.0.200', 'exec.stop': '= "/bin/sh /etc/rc.shutdown"', 'exec.stop = "/bin/sh /etc/rc.shutdown"': True, 'ip4.addr = 192.168.0.200': True, 'path': '= /jails/portsbuild', 'interface': '= nfe0', 'path = /jails/portsbuild': True, 'mount.devfs': True, 'host.hostname': '= portsbuild.home', 'host.hostname = portsbuild.home': True, 'exec.start': '= "/bin/sh /etc/rc"'}}

I've also tried my luck with pyparsing but it seems to be suitable with one way only. So, I am wondering if there's some other module or a way to parse that file using clean, and easy to understand piece of code, that would be usable in both ways, for reading and then writing after modification of python objects?

share|improve this question
    
Have you looked at pylens (pythonhosted.org/pylens)? –  Matthew Plourde Mar 27 '13 at 14:29
    
Would ConfigParser help? –  Sidharth Shah Mar 27 '13 at 14:36
    
@SidharthShah ConfigParser, if I am correct, is usable only in certain format, the unfortunately doesnt match what I am working on. –  SpankMe Mar 27 '13 at 16:29
    
@MatthewPlourde Thanks! This looks insteresting, and I will give it a try in lack of other solutions. –  SpankMe Mar 27 '13 at 16:29
    
@MatthewPlourde Unfortunately, its usage seems to be limited, and documentation is incomplete, also stating its more like a proof of concept library... –  SpankMe Mar 27 '13 at 16:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Parsley for the rescue! It seems that its the easiest module to write custom parsers with and results with python objects that are easy to convert back into a configuration file of the same, exact format. Sample solution with slightly bigger block below:

from parsley import makeGrammar, unwrapGrammar
from collections import OrderedDict

configFileGrammer = r"""

file = block+:bs end -> OrderedDict(bs)

block = ws name:b ws '{' ws members:m ws '}' ws -> (b, OrderedDict(m))

members = (setting:first (ws setting)*:rest ws -> [first] + rest) | -> []

setting = pair | flag

pair = ws name:k ws '=' ws name:v ws ';' ws -> (k, v)

flag = ws name:k ws ';' ws -> (k, True)

name = <(~('='|';'|'{') anything)+>:n -> n.strip()

"""


testSource = r"""
    portsbuild {
            path = /jails/portsbuild;
            allow.mount;
            mount.devfs;
            host.hostname = portsbuild.home;
            ip4.addr = 192.168.0.200;
            interface = nfe0;
            exec.start = "/bin/sh /etc/rc";
            exec.stop = "/bin/sh /etc/rc.shutdown";
    }

    web01 {
            path = /jails/web01;
            allow.mount;
            mount.devfs;
            host.hostname = web02.site.com;
            ip4.addr = 10.0.0.1;
            interface = eth0;
            exec.start = "/bin/sh /etc/rc";
    }

    db01 {
            path = /jails/db01;
            mount.devfs;
            host.hostname = db01.home;
            ip4.addr = 192.168.6.66;
            interface = if0;
            exec.start = "/bin/mysql";
    }


"""
ConfigFile = makeGrammar(configFileGrammer, globals(), name="ConfigFile")

config = unwrapGrammar(ConfigFile)(testSource).apply('file')[0]
for block in config:
    print "%s {" % block
    for key in config[block]:
        if config[block][key] == True:
            print "\t%s;" % key
        else:
            print "\t%s = %s;" % (key, config[block][key])
    print "}"
share|improve this answer
    
I'm looking to do something similar. How has it been working out? –  Jiminion Jul 26 '13 at 3:56
    
@Jim Works great so far, do you have any particular problems? –  SpankMe Jul 26 '13 at 7:33

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