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I've had a look at some questions before posting this and couldn't find what I was looking for, so if it's a duplicate I'm sorry.

I have this code:

cout << "The balance at year " << i << " will be " << char(156) << std::setprecision(2)
     << balance << endl;

To my knowledge this should print to the console something like:

£2.00
£100.46

*fyi Above are just examples I know there's nothing to suggest those numbers, but the format should look like that, right?

But here's my output:

£1e+002
£1.1e+002

Why is it doing this?

It was my understanding that using setprecision would show 2 decimal places and nothing more.

Oh and also noticed hardly any questions about printing doubles that said use setprecision actually state that this needs including:

#include <iomanip>
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You could save yourself some commentary by simply writing: double balance = 100.46; before the cout line. In C++, headers like <iomanip> can be included by other standard headers, so the explicit use is often not necessary. You're assuming an ISO 8859-1 or 8859-15 code set; that is OK in the short term, but it is as well to know that it could cause trouble later. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 27 '13 at 14:29
    
thanks for the comment but i simplified by sample code so that i wasnt posting unrelated stuff but no its not as simple as setting the double to equal a number and then just print that. –  AngryDuck Mar 27 '13 at 14:33
    
my double value im printing out is the result of a calculation so it needs its length fixed on print –  AngryDuck Mar 27 '13 at 14:34
1  
We all know your real code is more complex, but you should aim for an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example). You could have: #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main() { double balance = 100.457213; cout << "The balance at year " << i << " will be " << char(156) << std::setprecision(2) << balance << endl; } as the complete runnable program, couldn't you? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 27 '13 at 14:35
    
@leffler yea I'm sure i could but for something that required this kind of easy answer i really didn't think it was necessary –  AngryDuck Mar 27 '13 at 14:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

setprecision sets the precision, number of digits.

fixed sets fixed format.

i bet that'll fix it.

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Thank you very much, ill give it a try now and then give best answer if its working –  AngryDuck Mar 27 '13 at 14:25
    
Great thanks, that works ill accept answer now, Any chance of some votes on this question so that others might be drawn here first, a lot of the other answers actually say nothing about this or the include hence why i put "properly" in the title –  AngryDuck Mar 27 '13 at 14:28

Use std::fixed to set fixed format, rather than scientific notation.

cout << "The balance at year " << i << " will be " << char(156) << std::setprecision(2) << std::fixed << balance << endl;

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Do it like this:

cout << "The balance at year " << i << " will be " << char(156) << std::setprecision(2) << std::fixed << balance << endl;
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