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I'm trying to build a form dynamically from a JSON ojbect, which contains nested groups of form elements:

  $scope.formData = [
  {label:'First Name', type:'text', required:'true'},
  {label:'Last Name', type:'text', required:'true'},
  {label:'Coffee Preference', type:'dropdown', options: ["HiTest", "Dunkin", "Decaf"]},
  {label: 'Address', type:'group', "Fields":[
      {label:'Street1', type:'text', required:'true'},
      {label:'Street2', type:'text', required:'true'},
      {label:'State', type:'dropdown',  options: ["California", "New York", "Florida"]}
    ]},
  ];

I've been using ng-switch blocks, but it becomes untenable with nested items, like in the Address object above.

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/hairgamiMaster/dZ4Rg/

Any ideas on how to best approach this nested problem? Many thanks!

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4 Answers

up vote 30 down vote accepted

I think that this could help you. It is from an answer I found on a Google Group about recursive elements in a tree.

The suggestion is from Brendan Owen: http://jsfiddle.net/brendanowen/uXbn6/8/

<script type="text/ng-template" id="field_renderer.html">
    {{data.label}}
    <ul>
        <li ng-repeat="field in data.fields" ng-include="'field_renderer.html'"></li>
    </ul>
</script>

<ul ng-controller="NestedFormCtrl">
    <li ng-repeat="field in formData" ng-include="'field_renderer.html'"></li>
</ul>

The proposed solution is about using a template that uses the ng-include directive to call itself if the current element has children.

In your case, I would try to create a template with the ng-switch directive (one case per type of label like you did) and add the ng-include at the end if there are any child labels.

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1  
Many thanks- I think this is the the technique to use. Cheers! –  Hairgami_Master Mar 30 '13 at 17:29
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Might consider using ng-switch to check availability of Fields property. If so, then use a different template for that condition. This template would have an ng-repeat on the Fields array.

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Combining what @jpmorin and @Ketan suggested (slight change on @jpmorin's answer since it doesn't actually work as is)...there's an ng-if to prevent "leaf children" from generating unnecessary ng-repeat directives:

<script type="text/ng-template" id="field_renderer.html">
  {{field.label}}
  <ul ng-if="field.Fields">
      <li ng-repeat="field in field.Fields" 
         ng-include="'field_renderer.html'">
      </li>
  </ul>
</script>
<ul>
  <li ng-repeat="field in formData" ng-include="'field_renderer.html'"></li>
</ul>

here's the working version in Plunker

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I know this is an old question, but for others who might come by here though a search, I though I would leave a solution that to me is somewhat more neat.

It builds on the same idea, but rather than having to store a template inside the template cache etc. I wished for a more "clean" solution, so I ended up creating https://github.com/dotJEM/angular-tree

It's fairly simple to use:

<ul dx-start-with="rootNode">
  <li ng-repeat="node in $dxPrior.nodes">
    {{ node.name }}
    <ul dx-connect="node"/>
  </li>
</ul>
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