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The piece of code below works, but i want to avoid using recursion. ListOfAllNodes is flat list of all the nodes in the database, which has Id and ParentId fields.

private Node FillChildNodes(Node node)
{
   foreach (var childNode in ListOfAllNodes.Where(i => i.ParentId == node.Id).OrderBy(x => x.Name))
   {
           node.Children.Add(childNode);
           FillChildNodes(childNode);
   }
   return node;
}
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marked as duplicate by LarsTech, JDB, VanHalen, Ramshad, Mia Clarke Mar 27 '13 at 18:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6  
why do you want to avoid recursion? Recursion is not evil! There are situations where it makes sense to use it, and this is one of those! –  Mike Dinescu Mar 27 '13 at 14:28
2  
The improvement I would make is to pre-process the flat List into a dictionary in a single pass rather than re-parsing it on each call to FillChildNodes –  Mike Dinescu Mar 27 '13 at 14:28
    
You can use a Dictionary with key as node Id and value as node in the first pass and always lookup the parent from the dictionary in the second pass. Also, is your assumption that the data is valid(no cycles, all nodes have parents)? –  guruprasath Mar 27 '13 at 14:32
    
Isn't there an inherent risk of a stack overflow error, with recursion? –  JAG Mar 27 '13 at 14:35
1  
@JAG: There's a risk of OOM error every time you new up an object. You don't avoid objects, do you? No, because they're useful. As is recursion, if you use it responsibly. If you're really that worried about it, you could easily include a depth arg and throw an exception when the depth is exceeded...but a SO would do about the same thing and be a bit less arbitrary. –  cHao Mar 27 '13 at 16:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's the code to parse the flat list into a dictionary:

Dictionary<IComparable, List<Node>> nodes = new Dictionary<IComparable, List<Node>>();
Node parentNode = null;
foreach(var node in ListOfAllNodes)
{
    if(node.ParentId == null)
    {
        parentNode = node;
    }else
    {
        if(!nodes.ContainsKey(node.ParentId)){
           nodes.Add(node.ParentId, new List<Node>());
        }
        nodes[node.ParentId].Add(node);
    }
}

The code above assumes that all nodes have a valid (i.e. non-null) ParentId, except for one node which has a null ParentId which will be the top node. Then you could use the dictionary as a parameter to the FillChildNodes function:

private Node FillChildNodes(Node node, Dictionary<IComparable, List<Node>> dict)
{
   foreach (var childNode in dict[node.Id].OrderBy(x => x.Name))
   {
       node.Children.Add(childNode);
       FillChildNodes(childNode);
   }
   return node;
}

// call this on the variables build above:
FillChildNodes(parentNode, nodes);
share|improve this answer
    
His node class itself has childrens list which he wants to populate. He will need two passes unless the overall list is ordered in such a way that the parents come first. –  guruprasath Mar 27 '13 at 14:34
    
How do you know that the nodes in ListOfAllNodes all have children? he said the list is flat.. –  Mike Dinescu Mar 27 '13 at 14:37
    
Sorry, I meant the code before your edit. I did not mean all nodes will have children. I meant that the dictionary will have to be passed through again to populate the children nodes. –  guruprasath Mar 27 '13 at 14:38
    
the nodes don't all have children, some are leaf nodes. One node has a null parentId, and therefore is the 'top' –  JAG Mar 27 '13 at 14:39
    
@JAG - I believe the updated code above should handle it then. –  Mike Dinescu Mar 27 '13 at 14:42

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