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How can I use fscanf (or any other function that deals with stdins from a text file) to scan a certain group of integers, that have the same length, and put them in the same array, but at the same time ignore integers that are shorter than required

This is how the txt file looks:

63001234 1 1 -1 - - 0 1 1 1 - - 0
63001230 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
63001432 -1 -1 - - - - - - - - - -
63000176 - - 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1

I need to store the 63... numbers in one int array and '1','-1','0' and '-' in another char array.

this is now my scan and test function in one

int main() {

    printf("insert the name of the txt file you want to scan from: ");
    char fileopen [100];
    scanf("%s", fileopen);

    int Students [250];
    char Grades [250] [12];

    FILE *fop = fopen(fileopen ,"r");
    if(fop == NULL){
        printf("Error");
        EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    int counter = 0;

    //read file
    while(1){
        if(fscanf(fop,"%d",&Students[counter]) == EOF){
            break;
        }
        for(int j = 0; j < 12; j++){
            fscanf(fop," %c",&Grades[counter][j]);
        }
        fscanf(fop,"\n");
        counter++;

    }

    counter = 0;
    //test what has been written in the arrays 
    while(counter <= strlen(Students)){

       printf("%d", Students[counter]);
       for(int j = 0; j < 12; j++){
            printf(" %c", Grades[counter][j]);
        }
        counter++;
        printf("\n");
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Is order important? – Mohammad Ali Baydoun Mar 27 '13 at 14:51
    
Yeah, it is, because i need these numbers by order for later – TheGuyWithStreetCred Mar 27 '13 at 15:00
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can read to ints and chars directly instead of using a digit check:

// You can use dynamic memory allocation here instead, or an appropriate max size.
// I used 100 because this is a template.
int numbers[100];
int chars[100][12];

char* line = (char*)malloc(100);

int i = 0;
while (true)
{
    /* Read line into buffer */
    if ((fgets(line, 100, file) == NULL) || ferror(file) || feof(file))
    {
        break;
    }

    /* Skip empty lines */
    if (strcmp(line, "\n") != 0)
    {
        continue;
    }

    /* Scan the integer */
    if (i == 0) {
        sscanf(line, "%d", &numbers[0]);
    } else {
        sscanf(line, "\n%d", &numbers[i]);
    }

    /* Scan the 12 characters */
    for (unsigned int j = 0; j < 12; ++j)
    {
        sscanf(line, " %c", &chars[i][j]);
    }

    i++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Any other, more elegant solution? – TheGuyWithStreetCred Mar 27 '13 at 15:27
    
Does that look better? – Mohammad Ali Baydoun Mar 27 '13 at 15:37
    
Yes, indubitably, thank you kind sir – TheGuyWithStreetCred Mar 27 '13 at 15:41
1  
I haven't tried this, but multiple fscanf()s intended to process the same physical line is a brittle approach. Use fgets() to read a full line at a time, then sscanf() to tokenize it. – unwind Mar 27 '13 at 15:47
1  
@user2202368 if you're going to be a programmer, you should not be afraid to experiment on your own. You don't learn much having SO members do it all for you. Dive in and try it. – Randy Howard Mar 27 '13 at 16:01

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