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Which one is better? performance wise and best practice wise. and why?

if ((process_checking == true) && (standard_output.Contains("0")))
{
}
else if ((process_checking == true) && (standard_output.Contains("1")))
{
}

OR

if (process_checking==true)
{
   if (standard_output.Contains("0"))
   {
     blah
   }
   else
    //there is only 0 or 1 value
   {
      blah
   }
}
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5  
better in terms of? Performance, readability, maintenance? –  Steve Mar 27 '13 at 15:27
    
also if there is just 0 or 1 value, then no need of Contains() –  Praveen Nambiar Mar 27 '13 at 15:27
2  
Read Eric Lippert's Performance Rant for why this is likely getting downvoted. –  Austin Salonen Mar 27 '13 at 15:35
1  
@Fendy. with all due respect I disagree with your stmt "Do not fix what is not a problem". Sometimes we just want to know what others think to improve oneself. Isn't that what this is about? Discussion? –  John Ryann Mar 27 '13 at 15:42
1  
And no, it isn't about discussion. This might be a better fit for codereview.stackexchange.com. –  shambulator Mar 27 '13 at 15:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first one would have to look at the value of process_checking twice, so performance would be (very very negligibly) worse. And of course your assumption about the "0" and "1", the first one has to check for "1", which is a little extra work.

The real difference is readability. The second one is much more readable - it's very clear what you're doing, and that if process_checking is not true, the entire block gets skipped.

As long as you're not nesting too deep, a little bit of nesting is definitely preferred when it adds to readability.

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Great answer! (+1) –  feralin Mar 27 '13 at 15:30
    
+1 for "very very negligibly" –  Fendy Mar 27 '13 at 15:42
1  
I agree, but I'd add that it's possible that the compiler will optimize away that second check of process_checking in the first example. (Not that that would excuse its poor readability.) Someone much less lazy than I am could even try it, examine the MISL output, and let us all know the result. :) –  dgvid Mar 27 '13 at 15:47
    
@dgvid Good call, didn't think about that - the optimizer does find creative ways to help with stuff like that. But I also don't really feel like cracking open an IL disassembler to try it out. :) –  Joe Enos Mar 27 '13 at 15:55

In my opinion, the second version is better, because you do not repeat the process_checking condition. It is more readable, because the control flow is more recongnizable and understandable, and it might be very slightly more performant, because you do not need to recompute the process_checking if the first if clause fails. However, this is just my opinion; others may have differing views...

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The second instance is superior because it only does the process_checking comparison once. And since you say that there is only a 0 or 1 (the input has already been validated, which I assume is what your process_checking flag is for), it does not call the .Contains method twice and thus saves another function call and comparison.

Another neat thing you can do with boolean variables such as process_checking is to have it be the only part of that condition, like you have done with the .Contains method:

if (process_checking) 
{
    if (standard_output.Contains("0")) { /*stuff*/ }
    else { /*other stuff*/ }
}
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In my opinion, a combination of both will give better result, because, sometimes you address only two or three options, then you use if, else if and for more general, often use if with else, the better idea would be

if(condition = true)
{
// statements
}
else if(other condition = true)
{
// statements
}
else
{
// for all general options, which you have'nt addressed
}
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